Tag Archives: outdoor advertising

Ads, Ads, Everywhere….

 

Advertising is everywhere. Actually, make that EVERYWHERE! As far as the eye can see, it can land on an advertisement or promotion. Whether it is traditional media (such as radio and TV) or other places such as billboards, vending machines, bus stops, toilet stalls, gas pumps, subway turnstiles, street crossings… you get the point. We are surrounded by advertising.

A recent study estimates that daily media consumption is now at an all-time high of 9.8 hours. However, the good news for consumers is that they now have more tools (such as DVRs and remote controls) for avoiding ads. Another study noted that message and brand exposure can range anywhere from 3,000 to 20,000 messages per day. The higher numbers include labels seen in stores (or on clothes), ads in mailboxes, cars on the highway, etc. However, consumers cannot really process that many exposures. What does it amount to?

  • 5,000+ ads/brand exposure per day
  • 362 “ads only” exposure per day
  • 153 “ads only” noted per day
  • 86 “ads only that gain awareness per day
  • Finally, only 12 “ads only” made an impression

Bottom line: Only a very small number of advertisements make it through our filters and lead to sales. The tricky part for marketers is to determine which ads are the important ones.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Have students look around the room and in their backpacks/bags. How many ads or brands do they see?
  2. Poll students: Who watched TV last night? What ads do they recall?
  3. Show the article with chart: https://sjinsights.net/2014/09/29/new-research-sheds-light-on-daily-ad-exposures/
  4. Put students into teams. Have each team identify an advertisement that they can recall and believe is effective.
  5. Have the teams explain how this ad was effective.

Source: SJ Insights, Media Dynamics, Inc.

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Harley-Davidson Takes Over Ryder, ND

The motorcycle season is upon us, and this season, motorcycle manufacturer, Harley-Davidson, has a goal to take over an entire town and help every town resident get a motorcycle license. The town is Ryder, North Dakota, population 85. (Yes, that’s correct, 85 people.)

The company is partnering with Ryder, which has agreed to change its name to “Rider” for the 2017 motorcycle season. The town is the envy of other small towns as Harley-Davidson repainted the town’s water tower (which is a replica of the company’s water tower) and included the company name on one side. As the mayor stated, “The tower was in dire need of a paint job.” There has also been a street dance and party, along with stationary motorcycle for practice shifting gears. Harley-Davidson’s goal is to have Ryder become the first town in America where everyone has a motorcycle license.

Will this be enough to help the company though? Harley-Davidson is seeing slow sales, increased competition, an aging Baby Boomer consumer base, and an uninterested millennial market.

How about it – do you have a motorcycle license?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss how to build and use a SWOT analysis grid: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (internal and external factors).
  2. Show Harley-Davidson Web site: http://www.harley-davidson.com
  3. Video of the promotion: https://youtu.be/Ds3HugeXjHs
  4. For Harley-Davidson motorcycles, break students into teams and have each team build a SWOT analysis grid.
    1. Strengths: what is company good at?
    2. Weaknesses: what needs work?
    3. Opportunities: what is going on in marketplace?
    4. Threats: what should company be wary of?
  5. Based on the analysis, what are the issues and risks that might occur?
  6. Debrief by building SWOT analysis grid on the white board.

Source:  Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Brandchannel.com, other news sources

 

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Wienermobiles Drive Across America!

Have you ever seen the Wienermobile in person? It’s like seeing a famous celebrity – everyone stops and looks, takes a selfie, and smiles at the giant hot dog mobile. It’s a great rolling billboard that gets attention and promotes products.

The Wienermobile first began 80 years ago during the Depression as a way to promote product and make people smile. It’s gone through a number of style changes, but continues today with six vehicles and 12 official “Hotdoggers” who drive it and pass out dogs and smiles around the country. (More than 1,000 people applied last year for the 12 Hotdogger spots!)

This summer, the Wienermobiles are touring the country to spread the word about the reformulated hot dogs, now without any added nitrates, nitrites, artificial preservatives, or by-products. In addition to updating the products, Oscar Mayer is also using social media to engage consumers and help determine locations for the tour. Already visited was Whittier, Alaska, population 220, accessible via a 2.5 mile tunnel and icy roads

No word on the miles per gallon though (or does it run on mustard?).

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the stages in the product life cycle. What are the marketing objectives in each stage?
  2. Divide students into teams. Have each team draw a product life cycle and place various products and services into each stage.
  3. Discuss hot dogs and where they are in the product life cycle.
  4. Show the Wienermobile Web site: http://www.oscarmayer.com/wienermobile
  5. Show a video of the Wienermobile in Alaska: https://youtu.be/3e_1Z_oxt5g
  6. Now, have students brainstorm on how to reposition or revise products/services to that they can move into an earlier stage of the life cycle.

Source:  Advertising Age

 

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