Tag Archives: television

Super Bowl 2018 Advertising

With hundreds of millions of viewers worldwide, the Super Bowl has become one of the premier venues for marketers. The thrills, the chills, the laughter, the tears – and that’s just the advertisements! At a cost of $5 million for 30 seconds of air time, the Super Bowl is also the most expensive advertising placement of any event or show. Add the costs of designing and producing ads, plus the integration into other marketing tactics, and a company can easily spend upwards of $6 million at a single event.

Love them or hate them, Super Bowl advertisements have become a talking point during and after the game. It’s a big stage, and can also be a big risk. With an audience of 103 million viewers, the 52nd Super Bowl is one of the most watched TV program in U.S. history. And, days later, we are still watching ads, arguing about them, and measuring results.

Watch the ads – which ad is your favorite?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Bring up one of the Web sites that have all the Super Bowl ads: http://admeter.usatoday.com/results/2018
  2. Divide the students into teams.  Have each team select a Super Bowl ad to analyze and present in class.
  3. What is the target market, key message, and offer from the ad?
  4. How does the ad integrate with a company’s other advertisements?
  5. Are the messages integrated with a company’s Web site and social media?
  6. As a class, after each commercial have students assign one to five stars for the advertisements. Which advertisement won the class vote?

Source:  Ad Age Daily, Brandchannel.com, USA Today, other news sources

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

Ads, Ads, Everywhere….


Advertising is everywhere. Actually, make that EVERYWHERE! As far as the eye can see, it can land on an advertisement or promotion. Whether it is traditional media (such as radio and TV) or other places such as billboards, vending machines, bus stops, toilet stalls, gas pumps, subway turnstiles, street crossings… you get the point. We are surrounded by advertising.

A recent study estimates that daily media consumption is now at an all-time high of 9.8 hours. However, the good news for consumers is that they now have more tools (such as DVRs and remote controls) for avoiding ads. Another study noted that message and brand exposure can range anywhere from 3,000 to 20,000 messages per day. The higher numbers include labels seen in stores (or on clothes), ads in mailboxes, cars on the highway, etc. However, consumers cannot really process that many exposures. What does it amount to?

  • 5,000+ ads/brand exposure per day
  • 362 “ads only” exposure per day
  • 153 “ads only” noted per day
  • 86 “ads only that gain awareness per day
  • Finally, only 12 “ads only” made an impression

Bottom line: Only a very small number of advertisements make it through our filters and lead to sales. The tricky part for marketers is to determine which ads are the important ones.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Have students look around the room and in their backpacks/bags. How many ads or brands do they see?
  2. Poll students: Who watched TV last night? What ads do they recall?
  3. Show the article with chart: https://sjinsights.net/2014/09/29/new-research-sheds-light-on-daily-ad-exposures/
  4. Put students into teams. Have each team identify an advertisement that they can recall and believe is effective.
  5. Have the teams explain how this ad was effective.

Source: SJ Insights, Media Dynamics, Inc.

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

A Year after Super Bowl Ad: Death Wish Coffee

In the 2016 Super Bowl, small business Death Wish Coffee beat out 15,000 other small businesses to win a 30-second Super Bowl commercial, funded by Intuit QuickBooks. Before the commercial, the company had days where it sold low amounts of coffee each day from its Web site and New York coffee shop. What would happen to the business after the Super Bowl?

Before the Super Bowl, the company’s Web site had a resting count of approximately 500 visitors. By the time the ad finished running, there were more than 147,000 unique visitors on its Web site, and almost all were from mobile devices. And, during the Super Bowl game time, Death Wish Coffee sold more than $250,000 of coffee.

Today, the company is doing great and is still growing by leaps and bounds. In 2015, Death Wish Coffee had approximately $3 million in revenue, and their estimate for 2016 was an optimistic $10 million in revenue. But of course, that was BEFORE the Super Bowl ad. By the time last year ended, Death Wish Coffee revenue had doubled its estimates to $20 million!

“Super Bowl commercials work!”

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the risks and benefits of advertising at the Super Bowl.
  2. Show the Ad Age’s recent interview with the company: http://adage.com/article/special-section-super-bowl/death-coffee-s-year-long-super-bowl-high/308371/?utm_source=daily_email&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=adage&ttl=1490741042&utm_visit=226837
  1. For backstory about how this ad was developed, show the video “Anatomy of an Ad”:  http://adage.com/videos/a-super-bowl-death-wish-part-3/493 (Note: There are three videos in total that explain the process of developing the commercial. Students will find these behind-the-scenes interesting.)
  2. View the company’s Web site: http://www.deathwishcoffee.com/.
  3. Discuss why this ad and company have been so successful.

Source:  Ad Age Daily

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities