Tag Archives: Fitness

Toddler Bike Racing

It’s summertime and the weather is hot – perfect for riding bikes, and for competitive racing, too. Now, even toddlers can get in on the action at the Strider Cup balance bike races.

The Strider Cup is a series of four races, ending with a World Championship event. The festival also includes adventure zones for playing and test riding the balance bikes. It is focused on positive aspects of sports competitions for toddlers, and more importantly, teaches them how to easily learn to ride a bike.

In case you are not familiar with Strider and balance bikes, the company started when the founder wanted to share his love of adventure and riding with his 2-year old son. But, traditional tricycles and training wheel bikes didn’t offer the same adventure and off-road riding ability. What resulted was a kid’s bike without pedals or chains. Essentially, it is a light-weight, simple to ride bike where riders can keep their feet on the ground as they learn to balance and glide.

Strider is the leader in balance bikes, selling more than 1.6 million bikes in 70 different countries since 2007. There are several models of bikes, ranging from classic ($99.99) to pro ($169.99), and also offers special needs bikes for all abilities (up to $219.99).

Come on – let’s go for a ride!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Pricing is a complex topic. Discuss the six steps for pricing (determining objectives, estimating demand, determining cost/profit relationships, select price level, set list price, and make adjustments).
  2. Discuss the various pricing models in class: demand-oriented, cost-oriented, profit-oriented, and competition-oriented.
  3. Show Strider balance bikes Web site: https://www.striderbikes.com/
  4. Videos of the Strider Cup and the cute toddler racers: https://youtu.be/nwyDKv_v0P0
  5. For balance bikes, divide students into groups and have each group work on any/all of the six steps.
  6. When setting the price level, assign each team a different model to use (demand-oriented, cost- oriented, etc.).
  7. Debrief the exercise. Compare the various pricing models and discuss advantages/disadvantages of each.

Source:  Outside magazine   

 

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NBA Uniforms Take Sponsors

People love sports. We watch sports on TV, listen on the radio, read about victories and defeats in the news, and emulate those athletes who represent our ideals. We buy tennis racquets used by Serena Williams, golf clubs hit by Tiger Woods, and basketball gear worn by LeBron James. Sports and athletes are a common component in many companies’ marketing campaigns.

Thus, it seems only natural that the NBA, one of the largest sports franchises, is now going to allow companies to sponsor teams and have their logos emblazoned on team jerseys. Starting next season, new logo patches will be added to jerseys, with brands paying premium price for the NBA exposure.

So far, only six teams have signed sponsors:

  • Philadelphia 76ers have a three-year deal worth $5 million per year with StubHub.
  • Sacramento Kings signed with Blue Diamond Growers for a $5 million per year, three-year trial run.
  • Boston Celtics have an $8 million per year, three-year agreement with GE.
  • Brooklyn Nets also have a deal worth $8 million/year for three years with Infor.
  • Cleveland Cavaliers have a multi-year sponsorship with Goodyear that includes a $1 million donation to Cleveland and Akron public schools.
  • Utah Jazz has a $4 million sponsorship deal with Qualtrics, but will not use the company logo. Instead, it will use a logo for “5 For The Fight” campaign promoting cancer research.

Which companies do you want to see on your home team jerseys?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the role of branding and sponsorship of sports.
  2. Ask the students their opinions about the NBA jersey branding.
  3. Show the video of Goodyear sponsoring the Cavaliers:

https://youtu.be/dz0WRL3ttlY

  1. Divide students into team. Have each team select a company and brand to represent. Using company information about values and mission, have each student team select a sports team to sponsor.
  2. Explain how the company and team fit.
  3. Set metrics to measure the effectiveness of the sponsorship.

Source: Forbes, Brandchannel.com  

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Drink Up!

water

Do you drink enough water during the day? Sure, you might intend to drink up regularly, but intentions don’t always match actions. The problem came to a head for an entrepreneur in Minnesota when she continued to experience headaches. The problem, not drinking enough water. And, as often is the case, a problem sends consumers in search of new solutions. Thus, the Hidrate Spark “smart” water bottle was developed.

This is no ordinary water bottle. It features an innovative design and technology that tracks how much water is consumed, lights up when it’s time for more water, and also connects to smartphones and wearable devices such as FitBit. The Bluetooth-connected app records the customer’s height, weight, and activity level. Using location, the app adjusts water goals based on temperature, humidity, and elevation.

The BPA free water bottle holds 24 fluid ounces, has a battery life of one year, and even includes a “don’t leave me behind” tracking – just in case you forgot it behind.

So, go ahead and drink up!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Look around the classroom at the various types of water bottles carried by students. Poll students about how many water bottles they have, and if they believe that they drink enough water.
  2. Show the Kickstarter campaign and videos: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/582920317/hidrateme-smart-water-bottle?ref=nav_search
  3. Show the Hidrate Spark Web site: http://hidratespark.com/
  4. Since water bottles are ubiquitous, this product can be used to illustrate the importance of product differentiation.
  5. Discuss environmental scan factors: social trends, economic trends, technology, competition, regulations.
  6. Divide students into teams and have each team complete an environmental scan for this product.

Source: Minneapolis Star Tribune  

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