Tag Archives: packaging

Target Launches New Brand – “Smartly”

Not all innovation requires high-tech. Sure, shiny robots, drones, talking home pods, and self-driving cars get a lot of coverage in the innovation spot light. But there is plenty of innovation around in even the simplest of household items. The key is to make sure the innovation meets the needs of the customers.

A very simple new product line innovated and launched by Target this fall is called ‘Smartly’. Smartly is a new, low-price brand with more than 70 items priced below $2.00. That’s right. Two dollars. The products include household cleaners, razors, hand soap, paper plates, and toilet paper.

And it’s not just a low price point. Most of the products are sold as single-items, or in small multi-packs. This is ideal for space- and budget-conscious consumers, such as students and young apartment dwellers starting their first jobs.

Going along with the reduced packaging, prices are roughly 70% lower than traditional brands such as Tide, Gillette, and Charmin. And, the Smartly line even undercuts Target’s own Up & Up brand by about 50%.

Simple innovation can equal smart innovation.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the importance of clearly defining a target market.
  2. Explain the use of a product-market grid to determine market segments.
  3. Show Target’s new Smartly product line: https://www.target.com/c/smartly/-/N-r4rpp#?lnk=snav_rd_smartly
  4. Read Target’s announcement of the new line: https://corporate.target.com/article/2018/10/smartly
  5. Divide students into teams. Have each team build a market-product grid by identifying five market segments that shop at Target, and five categories of product groupings sold at Target.
  6. Where does Smartly fit in the product groupings? What market segment is the best one for Target to pursue with this new product line?
  7. Finally, how should the company promote the product line?

Source:  New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Target, other news sources

 

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Dunkin’ Donuts Will Get Rid of Foam Cups by 2020

We know Planet Earth is in trouble with changing weather patterns, and a significant problem with plastics polluting and harming the oceans. The planet deserves the respect, and need the help, of all citizens and corporations.

One significant problem faced around the globe is the increased use of foam packaging, which has often been cited as a source of many environmental problems. A number of environmentally-focused organizations have challenged global companies to reduce or eliminate their use of polystyrene.

One company heeding the call is Dunkin’ Donuts. The company recently announced its plan to eliminate all polystyrene foam cups throughout its global supply chain by 2020. The coffee giant will replace foam coffee cups with double-walled paper cups. The majority of the company’s international operations have already begun using paper cups; New York City and California will be adopting the new cups this year.

The move to eliminate foam cups is a significant change in the company’s supply and distribution chains. This is no small matter – there are more than 9,000 Dunkin’ Donuts restaurants in the U.S. alone – that’s a lot of coffee cups!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss setting SMART objectives (specific, measureable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound).
  2. Show video about Dunkin’ Donuts switch: https://youtu.be/3kAP01BeRo4
  3. What are the SMART objectives set by Dunkin’ Donuts?
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team develop five SMART objectives for a product of their choosing. Have the goals reflect various strategies including growth, sustainability, profitability, etc.
  5. Discuss the objectives. How would the objectives change if a different strategy was used?
  6. Debrief the exercise.

Source:  Sustainable Brands (9 February, 2018). Dunkin’ Donuts to eliminate foam cups by 2020.

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New Diet Coke Flavors and Package

Diet Coke is definitely a mature product. And, like many mature products, it needs to continue to fit into today’s consumer’s lifestyle in order to stay relevant. First introduced in 1982, Diet Coke was recently relaunched with four bold, new flavors and a new packaging look. (And, if you’re a fan of the traditional Diet Coke, don’t worry, it will still be available.)

Coca-Cola took two years to research and develop the new drinks, speaking to more than 10,000 people across the country to get ideas on flavors, packages, and more. Based on the results, the company tested more than 30 new flavors. The final results are now in and ready for drinking. The new flavors that had the most positive consumer response include Ginger Lime, Feisty Cherry, Zesty Blood Orange, and Twisted Mango. The new Diet Coke flavors are also packaged in slim 12-oz. cans (same can as DASANI sparkling drinks) and come singly and in eight-packs.

Coca-Cola is walking a fine line between maintaining an existing and still popular brand (Diet Coke) and building a new flavor profile and brand look for an iconic product.

What are you thirsty for today?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

    1. Discuss the stages in the product life cycle. What are the marketing objectives in each stage?
    2. Where does Diet Coke fit on the product life cycle?
    3. Discuss how Coca-Cola worked to reposition Diet Coke.
    4. View the press release and story: http://www.coca-colacompany.com/stories/diet-coke-flavors
    5. Show a video of the new product line: https://youtu.be/51QDzjEOBc4
    6. For information on packaging and design: http://www.coca-colacompany.com/stories/diet-coke-design
    7. Divide students into teams. Have each team draw a product life cycle and place various products and services into each stage.
    8. Next, have students brainstorm on how to reposition or revise products/services to that they can move into an earlier stage of the life cycle.

Source: Brandchannel.com (10 January, 2018). Diet Coke relaunches in North America with new design and flavors.

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