Tag Archives: clothing

New “PJ Suit” for Working From Home

What are you wearing? Hmmm…that is rather a provocative question, and we’re not sure you should ask your co-workers. But, in these days of work-from-home attire, people around the world have been impacted and have adopted new types of ‘business’ attire. Some wear sweats, some wear suits, some wear pajamas, and then there are a unique set of people who want the combination of BOTH business and sweats.

Enter: the WFH Jammies, designed by Japanese firm Whatever.

The concept began with the recognition that Zoom calls and virtual meetings require workers to dress up for the video, but the rest of the day they wanted the comfort of pajamas. WFH Jammies is a unisex suite of a shirt-and-sweat combination that comes in white, pink, and polka-dot. It’s not the only solution; Aoki’s Pajamas suit is in a flexible knit fabric that looks dignified enough to stand-in for a suit jacket and turtleneck, and doesn’t wrinkle from your afternoon nap. Other fashion brands are following suit with their own comfy-but-formal-enough attire.

Wear these PJs and give a presentation online right after you get up, take a nap in comfort at lunch time, and still look professional for the evening Zoom wrap-up meeting.

So… what are you wearing?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss new product development. What are the steps that go into developing a new product or service?
  2. What are key considerations?
  3. Show the WFJ Jammies on Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/197719879/wfh-jammies
  4. WFH Jammies page: https://whatever.co/work/wfh-jammies/
  5. Show Whatever’s website: https://whatever.co/
  6. Video: https://youtu.be/ishqJgmy4Ao
  7. Divide students into teams. Have each team list other work-from-home problems that need new solutions.

Source: Wall Street Journal

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Rent and return these shoes

Let’s start with a quiz: How many running or athletic pairs of shoes do you own? How long do they last? How much do you spend?

If your closet is like mine, you probably have at least six pairs, of which five pairs are very used and dirty. It would be nice if we could wear running shoes until they are worn or dirty, and then just trade it them in for a new pair. Well, as luck would have it, Swiss footwear company On Running is now offering a new running shoe called “Cyclon.” But Cyclon is not for sale – only for rent. Yes, rent. Use, wear, and return them for a new pair.

Cyclon is available for a monthly fee of $29.95. It is a subscription service for not only a performance running shoe, but a fully recyclable plant-based shoe. Castor beans are used as the base, and the shoe upper is sewn from a single piece of fabric to help reduce waste. On Running focused on the challenges of not only creating a fully recyclable shoe, but also making sure that the shoes were returned to be recycled. Thus, the subscription model of ‘rent and return’ gives On control of the recycling process.

It seems to have resonated with the market – in the first 48 hours after launching Cyclon On signed 2,000 subscribers! On needs 5,000 people to sign up per region in order to ship the shoes at reduced carbon footprint of the transportation.

Let’s go for a run!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss a subscription business model. Poll students: What subscription services do they use? Other services they can name? (Ex: meal kits, shave clubs, entertainment, etc.).
  2. Poll students: On average, how much do they pay for a running shoe and how long does it last? How many pairs of athletic shoes do they have currently?
  3. Show On Running website: https://www.on-running.com/en-us/cyclon
  4. Show video of founders discussing Cyclon: https://youtu.be/VtosSdRZcsA
  5. What is the target market for Cyclon?
  6. What elements should be in the marketing program for this shoe?

Sources: Outside Online; other news sources

 

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The Era of the Fashionable Face Mask

So far the year 2020 has drastically altered lives around the world in every way possible. Think about it – since this past March, there has been a significant shift in consumer spending patterns. Globally, consumers have changed what they buy and where they buy it. Stores and restaurants closed. Online shopping boomed. And more.

Just consider what happened during the toilet paper shortage of 2020 to see how consumer behavior changed. And it’s not just toilet paper or flour; the global coronavirus pandemic has made changes not only in our households, work, education, transportation, social groups, but also in fashion. Fashion? Yes, fashion.

As recently as March (only five months ago!) it was doubtful that the average U.S. household had a supply of face masks. Think about it. Did your household stock any face masks prior to 2020? Now compare that with the number of face masks you have today in your home, car, briefcase, purse, bike bag, and office. It’s quite a big change and has created an entirely new product category for fashionable face masks.

There is a lot of variety and of course price variations. Some companies are giving away face masks branded with their logo. Other companies are creating new patterns and designs that let people express their personalities. They can be as inexpensive as cloth masks for a dollar or two, all the way up to a $1.5 million jeweled mask!b

Stay safe – and fashionable.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: What industries do they think are affected by the coronavirus? (Did any list fashion?)
  2. Discuss the impacts of the coronavirus on companies.
  3. Poll students: How many face masks did they have at the beginning of the year? How many do they have now?
  4. Show video of world’s most expensive mask: https://www.impomag.com/home/video/21160288/the-worlds-most-expensive-mask?lt.usr=71617211&utm_source=IMPO+Insider_08142020&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=115163&utm_term=600946
  5. In groups or individually, have students do an Internet search for masks. Suggest they try their favorite brands, Amazon, Etsy, and more.
  6. Have students examine the different brands and determine the target market for that mask.
  7. Select several target market segments: have student develop a mask for the market segment considering the four Ps.

Source:  Associated Press; CNET; IMPO; other news sources

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