China’s Great Firewall

While many people and countries view the Internet as a place of total freedom to say whatever they want – often without fear of reprisal – inside of China’s Great Firewall there exists an extensive system of filters and controls. The system is often quite subjective, and at times even contradictory. Nonetheless, for the 700 million Chinese, use is growing exponentially.

This summer, China’s fast-growing digital media sector set 68 categories of material that are censored. The guidelines ban material that include excessive drinking or gambling, sensationalizing criminal cases, ridicules historical revolutionary leaders, current members of the military, police, judiciary, or anything that promotes and publicizes “luxury life.” Also banned are material associated with prostitution, rape, affairs, partner swapping, and sexual liberation.

Despite the restrictions and bans, China’s Internet continues to expand. While China bans Facebook, Twitter, and Google apps, the use of WeChat in the country is expanding. In China, WeChat is a super-app that does virtually everything a user needs, all from within the app itself. Need a service? Want to schedule a lunch? Transfer funds? Post a review? Buy something? It is all contained within the app, making it powerful, and also a little scary. Advertisers love it, but all data must be shared with the Chinese government.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the freedoms of the Internet. Are there downsides to this?
  2. View the NYT video on WeChat in China: https://nyti.ms/2jZdURP
  3. How does the Great Firewall impact global marketing?
  4. Show the TED Talk about China’s Great Firewall: https://www.ted.com/talks/michael_anti_behind_the_great_firewall_of_china
  5. What are the implications for global commerce?

Source: New York Times

 

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Ads, Ads, Everywhere….

 

Advertising is everywhere. Actually, make that EVERYWHERE! As far as the eye can see, it can land on an advertisement or promotion. Whether it is traditional media (such as radio and TV) or other places such as billboards, vending machines, bus stops, toilet stalls, gas pumps, subway turnstiles, street crossings… you get the point. We are surrounded by advertising.

A recent study estimates that daily media consumption is now at an all-time high of 9.8 hours. However, the good news for consumers is that they now have more tools (such as DVRs and remote controls) for avoiding ads. Another study noted that message and brand exposure can range anywhere from 3,000 to 20,000 messages per day. The higher numbers include labels seen in stores (or on clothes), ads in mailboxes, cars on the highway, etc. However, consumers cannot really process that many exposures. What does it amount to?

  • 5,000+ ads/brand exposure per day
  • 362 “ads only” exposure per day
  • 153 “ads only” noted per day
  • 86 “ads only that gain awareness per day
  • Finally, only 12 “ads only” made an impression

Bottom line: Only a very small number of advertisements make it through our filters and lead to sales. The tricky part for marketers is to determine which ads are the important ones.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Have students look around the room and in their backpacks/bags. How many ads or brands do they see?
  2. Poll students: Who watched TV last night? What ads do they recall?
  3. Show the article with chart: https://sjinsights.net/2014/09/29/new-research-sheds-light-on-daily-ad-exposures/
  4. Put students into teams. Have each team identify an advertisement that they can recall and believe is effective.
  5. Have the teams explain how this ad was effective.

Source: SJ Insights, Media Dynamics, Inc.

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Corruption Index 2016

While the world is not a perfect place, people still hold out hope that it can become a better place for all citizens across the globe. However, a vicious cycle of corruption, unequal distribution of wealth, and unequal distribution of power, all conspire to create a climate of corruption in every nation on the planet.

Transparency International is a global organization with a vision of a “world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.” The organization is a non-profit, non-governmental organization dedicated to fighting corruption. One of its most public tools in the Corruption Perceptions Index, which measures corruption around the world. It ranks countries on a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean).

Unfortunately, no country gets a perfect score in the 2016 Corruption Perceptions Index. Two-thirds of the 176 countries measured were below the mid-point score. The global average: 43 out of 100, and top-scoring nations were far outnumbered by countries were citizens face corruption daily.

  • Top score: Denmark and New Zealand with a score of 90.
  • Low score: Somalia with a score of 10.

Curious where the United States ranks? Check out the Index and see the results.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the role of ethics, legality, and corruption in global marketing. What are the differences? What factors contribute to a poor business climate? To a poor living situation for citizens?
  2. Before showing the Index, poll students as to the countries that they believe will score the best, and worst, on corruptions.
  3. Show a video for the Corruptions Perception Index: https://youtu.be/zshdwWrsv3I
  4. Bring up the Index: https://www.transparency.org/news/feature/corruption_perceptions_index_2016
  5. Divide students into teams. Have each team analyze an area of the world and locate the high performing and low performing countries. What are the contributing factors to these scores?

Source: Transparency International

 

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