Tag Archives: branding

PepsiCo Buys Bare Snacks

Consumer taste trends are moving to healthy and natural foods.  Organic and non-GMO healthy snacks are a growing industry segment that is particularly appealing to Millennials and Generation Z.

What should a company do to take advantage of the new industry and market segments? While companies can develop new products, market adoption of the new products can take valuable time, and development itself takes resources and money away from a company’s established products. A faster way to enter a new market with a new product is through acquisition. Case in point is PepsiCo’s recent purchase of snack manufacturer Bare Foods Co. to help bolster Pepsi’s health snack offerings.

Bare Snacks was founded in 2001 by a family-owned organic apple farm in Washington. It began by selling baked apple chips in local farmers’ markets. Today, the Bare line of fruit and vegetable snacks are sold at Starbucks, Costco, Whole Foods, Kroger, Target, and more. The products are made from simple ingredients that are baked (not fried) and are officially non-GMO verified. Bare Snacks is a certified B-Corp and reflects its values statements in its products: simplicity, goodness, be real, and live fully.

Bare and Pepsi – an unusual, but winning combination.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

    1. Discuss the four primary marketing strategies: market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification.
    2. Which strategy did Bare Snacks use?
    3. Which strategy did PepsiCo using?
    4. Show Bare Snacks Web site: https://baresnacks.com/
    5. Show PepsiCo Web site: http://www.pepsico.com/
    6. Compare the two sites, products, and messages.
    7. Divide students into teams. Have each team select one of the four different strategies and explain why that strategy could be used to market Bare Snacks
    8. Have each team determine the marketing mix (4Ps) to support their strategy choice.

Source: Brandchannel.com (25 May, 2018). PepsiCo adds Bare Snacks to Frito-Lay Portfolio.

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Billie Body Brand – No More Pink Tax!

Why is it that many products that are quite similar in scope and use cost more when sold to women compared to men? It’s sometimes referred to as the “pink tax” when women are charged more than men for feminine products and general services. According to a study done by New York City in 2015, girl’s clothes cost 4% more than boy’s clothes, women pay 7% more than men for accessories such as bags and watches, 8% more than men for clothing, and 13% more than men for personal care products.

Enter Billie – a company that offers a direct-to-consumer product line of female-focused razors, shaving creams, and lotions developed – and priced – for women. One might think of it as the female equivalent of male-focused Dollar Shave Club, but according to Billie’s founders, it really wants to be a friend to its customers and be considered a body brand. It offers a subscription service of razors delivered every one, two, or three months at a price point of $9.00, including free shipping.

Billie makes a point of listening to its customers and forging relationships. They try to treat customers as friends and be helpful and in tune. Billie doesn’t want to tell women how they should look, but do want women to have a choice and provide an affordable solution designed specifically for women.

No more pink tax!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the stages in
  2. The New York City study report: http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dca/downloads/pdf/partners/Study-of-Gender-Pricing-in-NYC.pdf
  3. View
  4. View Billie’s story: https://youtu.be/810UnL8ZTNk
  5. View Billie Web site: https://mybillie.com/
  6. Discuss competition: what are the direct competitors for this product? Indirect competitors?
  7. Divide students into teams. Have each team compare one of Billie’s product with a competitive product. What are the points of difference?
  8. Draw a positioning map for Billie.

Source: Brady, S. (8 May, 2018). Making mundane magic: 5 questions with Billie co-founder Georgina Gooley. Brandchannel.com

 

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Where Do YOU Want to Work?

Many students get confused when they are searching for jobs. They’re not confused about getting a job – they know this part. But, they get confused about selecting which company they would most like to work for. Some of their questions include:

  • Should I select based on the job offer?
  • Or, should I select based on the company?
  • Should it be a company I admire?
  • Or, is it ok to work for a company I don’t admire, but they will pay me the most?
  • What is the growth potential of the company?
  • How can I research about a company’s attributes?

These topics can stymie even long-time marketing professionals. It can be hard to evaluate a company when not much is known about it. Thus, this is where the network comes into play. Instead of basing decisions only on one’s own limited knowledge, use the power of the network to help research and evaluate choices.

Providing what could valuable information in the evaluation of companies is the power of the LinkedIn network. Based on data from its more than 546 million professionals (146+ million who are in the U.S.), LinkedIn has compiled a list of the companies where professionals would most like to work. The list is based on billions of actions taken by LinkedIn members in regards to four main pillars of engagement: (1) interest in the company, (2) engagement with the company’s employees, (3) job demand, and (4) employee retention.

Here are the top 10 finalists for the 50 companies most want to work at in the U.S.:

  1. Amazon
  2. Alphabet
  3. Facebook
  4. Salesforce
  5. Tesla
  6. Apple
  7. Comcast NBC Universal
  8. The Walt Disney Company
  9. Oracle
  10. Netflix

Where do you want to work?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Suggestion: For this discussion, invite someone from the campus career services center to attend class and moderate the discussion.
  2. Discuss what attributes students look for in an employer.
  3. What do they want most? What do they want least?
  4. Divide students into teams. Based on the attributes the team wants most, have each team list 10 different companies where they would like to work.
  5. Compare the results between teams.
  6. Show the LinkedIn article and list of top companies to work for in the U.S. : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/linkedin-top-companies-2018-where-us-wants-work-now-daniel-roth/
  7. How many of these companies are on (or not on) the students’ lists?

Source: Roth, D. (21 March, 2018). LinkedIn top companies 2018: Where the U.S. wants to work now. LinkedIn.com.

 

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