Tag Archives: branding

NBA Uniforms Take Sponsors

People love sports. We watch sports on TV, listen on the radio, read about victories and defeats in the news, and emulate those athletes who represent our ideals. We buy tennis racquets used by Serena Williams, golf clubs hit by Tiger Woods, and basketball gear worn by LeBron James. Sports and athletes are a common component in many companies’ marketing campaigns.

Thus, it seems only natural that the NBA, one of the largest sports franchises, is now going to allow companies to sponsor teams and have their logos emblazoned on team jerseys. Starting next season, new logo patches will be added to jerseys, with brands paying premium price for the NBA exposure.

So far, only six teams have signed sponsors:

  • Philadelphia 76ers have a three-year deal worth $5 million per year with StubHub.
  • Sacramento Kings signed with Blue Diamond Growers for a $5 million per year, three-year trial run.
  • Boston Celtics have an $8 million per year, three-year agreement with GE.
  • Brooklyn Nets also have a deal worth $8 million/year for three years with Infor.
  • Cleveland Cavaliers have a multi-year sponsorship with Goodyear that includes a $1 million donation to Cleveland and Akron public schools.
  • Utah Jazz has a $4 million sponsorship deal with Qualtrics, but will not use the company logo. Instead, it will use a logo for “5 For The Fight” campaign promoting cancer research.

Which companies do you want to see on your home team jerseys?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the role of branding and sponsorship of sports.
  2. Ask the students their opinions about the NBA jersey branding.
  3. Show the video of Goodyear sponsoring the Cavaliers:

https://youtu.be/dz0WRL3ttlY

  1. Divide students into team. Have each team select a company and brand to represent. Using company information about values and mission, have each student team select a sports team to sponsor.
  2. Explain how the company and team fit.
  3. Set metrics to measure the effectiveness of the sponsorship.

Source: Forbes, Brandchannel.com  

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Wienermobiles Drive Across America!

Have you ever seen the Wienermobile in person? It’s like seeing a famous celebrity – everyone stops and looks, takes a selfie, and smiles at the giant hot dog mobile. It’s a great rolling billboard that gets attention and promotes products.

The Wienermobile first began 80 years ago during the Depression as a way to promote product and make people smile. It’s gone through a number of style changes, but continues today with six vehicles and 12 official “Hotdoggers” who drive it and pass out dogs and smiles around the country. (More than 1,000 people applied last year for the 12 Hotdogger spots!)

This summer, the Wienermobiles are touring the country to spread the word about the reformulated hot dogs, now without any added nitrates, nitrites, artificial preservatives, or by-products. In addition to updating the products, Oscar Mayer is also using social media to engage consumers and help determine locations for the tour. Already visited was Whittier, Alaska, population 220, accessible via a 2.5 mile tunnel and icy roads

No word on the miles per gallon though (or does it run on mustard?).

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the stages in the product life cycle. What are the marketing objectives in each stage?
  2. Divide students into teams. Have each team draw a product life cycle and place various products and services into each stage.
  3. Discuss hot dogs and where they are in the product life cycle.
  4. Show the Wienermobile Web site: http://www.oscarmayer.com/wienermobile
  5. Show a video of the Wienermobile in Alaska: https://youtu.be/3e_1Z_oxt5g
  6. Now, have students brainstorm on how to reposition or revise products/services to that they can move into an earlier stage of the life cycle.

Source:  Advertising Age

 

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Viral Videos for May 2017

This week’s viral video is a great mix of ideas, with several longer videos in the top spots. Hyundai’s short adventure film features its cars on an icy trip in “Shackleton’s Return.” Heineken also retains a top spot for its short film, “Worlds Apart.” The film pairs strangers (who happen to have opposite viewpoints) working together to build a bar, then finding out who they have really been talking to. It’s time to be open-minded, listen, and talk about differences.

There are three key factors for viral video success:

  1. Reaching the tastemakers.
  2. Building a community of participation.
  3. Creating unexpectedness in the video.

Regardless of the type of product or service, the country of origin, or the importance of the message, what matters is reaching the audience in a way the both entertains and informs. It might be YouTube, and more often now, it’s on Facebook and other social media. Check out this week’s top videos and discuss what makes them “go viral.”

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Bring up a recent Ad Age’s weekly Viral Video chart: http://adage.com/article/the-viral-video-chart/viral-video-chart-5-1-17/308885/
  2. How effective is each video at getting the company’s brand and message across to viewers?
  3. In teams, have students design a viral video for a product of their choosing. What are the elements that are needed to go viral?

Source:  Advertising Age

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