Tag Archives: Food

A Lesson on the ‘Pink Tax’ from Burger King

Price discrimination is illegal, but nonetheless it exists. Previous articles on this blog have discussed the ‘Pink Tax’ that women encounter when buying products that are the same (or nearly identical) to those bought by their male counterparts. Oftentimes, the only difference in the products is simply the color – using pink to attract female buyers.

Research confirms this pricing discrepancy. According to a study done by New York City in 2015, girl’s clothes cost 4% more than boy’s clothes, women pay 7% more than men for accessories such as bags and watches, 8% more than men for clothing, and 13% more than men for personal care products. In total, price differences cost women $1,351 per year more than men. (And yet, women on average are paid only 79% of the wage paid to men.)

To highlight the topic, Burger King took a creative approach and released a 60-second video that shows just how crazy it is to ask women to pay more for a product that is packaged in pink. In the spot, pink-boxed Chicken Fries are sold for $3.09, while regular packaged Chicken Fries are only $1.69. Unsuspecting female customers have some great reactions!

What other examples of the ‘Pink Tax” can you uncover?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: What is their experience with price discrimination between males and females? Why do they think there is a difference in prices?
  2. Show the Burger King video: https://youtu.be/7rtHmSfYDbs
  3. Vox also has a brief overview of the pink tax: https://www.vox.com/2018/3/30/17179350/pink-tax-beauty-products-gender-inequality-women
  4. Divide students into team. Have each team research products that are similar for men and women (such as clothes, health and beauty products, sports, etc.).
  5. List the products and prices on the white board.
  6. What could be done to correct the price discrimination?
  7. Note: The New York City study report is available at: http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dca/downloads/pdf/partners/Study-of-Gender-Pricing-in-NYC.pdf

Source: Ad Week; New York City Consumer Affairs

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Mealtime Bribery

It can be tough to get kids to eat their vegetables. (College students might not have this problem, but parents certainly do.) Let’s face it. Most kids would rather have candy, or soda, or French fries, or anything other than eat parent-endorsed healthy foods. What’s a parent to do?

One solution is of course an all-out battle with consequences for not eating healthy. But another solution could be to use bribery! In other words, “If you eat your vegetables, you get a treat.” And maybe that treat could be Ore Ida’s French fries…

And, since not all parents are comfortable with the idea of bribery to encourage good behavior, Ore Ida wisely renamed the practice as ‘Potato Pay’. It’s pretty simple. Set an exchange rate (aka bribe) for each healthy food that kids eat. Broccoli could be worth two fries, carrots equal one fry, and Brussel sprouts are worth five fries! The exchange rate can even vary depending on the child and vegetable. Don’t struggle – pay with French fries.

What’s the exchange rate in your house?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Were they picky eaters? Do they have young cousins or siblings who always present a challenge at meal times? How did their families handle this?
  2. Show the potato pay video: https://youtu.be/x8ZUvU_SW-I
  3. Web site: http://www.trypotatopay.com/
  4. Suggested mealtime bribery chart: http://www.trypotatopay.com/MealtimeBriberyChart.pdf
  5. Have students analyze how Ore Ida created a full campaign.
  6. Divide students into groups. Challenge each group to identify a problem faces by parents at meal time.
  7. What is a creative solution that a food company could use to market its products to solve the problem?

Source: Griner, D. (13 July 2018). Kids won’t eat veggies? Bribe them shamelessly with Ore-Ida’s ‘Potato Pay’.

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Funko Launches Cereal Brand

Successful brand extensions can be a tricky to accomplish. Brands usually have a strong identity, and are often associated with a single or unique product line. Extending the brand into a new area or industry can be difficult, expensive, and not always successful. The best brand extensions stay true to their original brand identity and market spaces. For example, Coca-Cola can take its strong global brand to include beverages other than sodas, but it would certainly struggle to extend its brand to a new industry such as entertainment.

A new brand extension is underway by Funko, known for its Pop! bobblehead toys and characters. The new entry by Funko is for a line of cereals – FunkO’s – that will have a retro flair and (of course) include a toy collectible in the boxes. The first line will have more than 40 characters and each cereal will have an exclusive U.S. retail partner (not at grocery stores).

The cereals arrive this summer with a suggested retail price of $7.99. The cereal product line will continue the Funko tradition of distributing collectible figures with fun designs. Each cereal box will include mini Pocket Pop! figures and the packaging will have activities, puzzles, and games.

The first releases are expected in July and August, and include:

  • Mega man FunkO’s (at GameStop)
  • Cuphead & Mugman FunkO’s (at Hot Topic)
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street’s Freddy Krueger FunkO’s (at f.y.e.)
  • The Lord of the Ring’s Gollum FunkO’s (at Box Lunch)
  • Beetlejuice FunkO’s (and Box Lunch)
  • Huckleberry Hound FunkO’s (at Funko.com)

Let’s grab a box, munch, and watch cartoons!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Who eats cereal? What type? Who buys Funko products?
  2. Show Funko’s Web site and the new product line: https://www.funko.com/blog/article/introducing-funko-s-putting-the-fun-back-in-breakfast
  3. Discuss competition: what are the direct competitors for this product? Indirect competitors?
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team compare FunkO cereal product with a competitive product. What are the points of difference (what makes FunkO cereal different from competition)?
  5. Debrief the exercise.

Source: Guess who’s coming to breakfast? This summer, FunkO’s cereal. (2 July 2018). Brandchannel.com

 

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