Tag Archives: Food

Fund-Raising with Healthy Options

We can usually tell when it is fund-raising season for schools and sports. Kids stop by houses and businesses, selling chocolate bars and other items to help fund a variety of programs and causes. And, although we happily buy and eat the candy, there can be some regrets over the empty calories, and the lack of sales going to local businesses. Wouldn’t it be better to offer healthy alternatives, and support local businesses? Of course! Enter a new company: FarmRaiser – connects fundraising groups with local products and foods.

FarmRaiser was founded in Michigan with a mission to connect local farmers and food artisans with schools, athletic teams, bands, and other causes. Vendors must meet standards for sustainable practices, and artisan products that do NOT list sugar as the first ingredient are welcome. The company states that “if a product has more than five or six ingredients, and if any of them are ones your grandma wouldn’t recognize it doesn’t make the cut.”

Campaigns are customized by working with a FarmRaiser “cultivator” to help determine fund-raiser goals, local products, and vendors. Each campaign also gets its own Web page on FarmRaiser.com. The company estimates that 85% of funds raised stays in the community; the average profit margin is 53% for the groups. The process is straightforward: once the cause is registered, FarmRaiser helps create a custom online and mobile market. At the end of the sale period, students help distribute the produce and products to their customers. Groups can choose various products and goods from multiple regions. Try combining Michigan cherries, with Texas Salsa.

What sounds good to you?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the fundraising activities that students might have done. Discuss what was it about, proceeds, products, process, etc.
  2. Introduce the topic of changing the product mix and sales process.
  3. Show a video about the company: https://vimeo.com/147806697
  4. Show Web site: https://www.farmraiser.com/
  5. Divide students into team. Have each team select a cause and develop a product set.
  6. Set SMART objectives for the company.

Source: Rieth, D. (Summer 2018). Home field advantage. Edible Michiana.

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

PepsiCo Buys Bare Snacks

Consumer taste trends are moving to healthy and natural foods.  Organic and non-GMO healthy snacks are a growing industry segment that is particularly appealing to Millennials and Generation Z.

What should a company do to take advantage of the new industry and market segments? While companies can develop new products, market adoption of the new products can take valuable time, and development itself takes resources and money away from a company’s established products. A faster way to enter a new market with a new product is through acquisition. Case in point is PepsiCo’s recent purchase of snack manufacturer Bare Foods Co. to help bolster Pepsi’s health snack offerings.

Bare Snacks was founded in 2001 by a family-owned organic apple farm in Washington. It began by selling baked apple chips in local farmers’ markets. Today, the Bare line of fruit and vegetable snacks are sold at Starbucks, Costco, Whole Foods, Kroger, Target, and more. The products are made from simple ingredients that are baked (not fried) and are officially non-GMO verified. Bare Snacks is a certified B-Corp and reflects its values statements in its products: simplicity, goodness, be real, and live fully.

Bare and Pepsi – an unusual, but winning combination.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

    1. Discuss the four primary marketing strategies: market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification.
    2. Which strategy did Bare Snacks use?
    3. Which strategy did PepsiCo using?
    4. Show Bare Snacks Web site: https://baresnacks.com/
    5. Show PepsiCo Web site: http://www.pepsico.com/
    6. Compare the two sites, products, and messages.
    7. Divide students into teams. Have each team select one of the four different strategies and explain why that strategy could be used to market Bare Snacks
    8. Have each team determine the marketing mix (4Ps) to support their strategy choice.

Source: Brandchannel.com (25 May, 2018). PepsiCo adds Bare Snacks to Frito-Lay Portfolio.

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

Mayo + Ketchup = Mayochup!

Who likes mayonnaise? Who likes ketchup? Who combines the two? If you are like millions of other consumers in the U.S., then you like combining the two products into a single sauce. And, now, Heinz wants to bring the combined taste to you in one convenient bottle!

Yes, a new condiment that combines the two sauces is being developed for the U.S. market. Heinz recently taunted consumers, asking people to vote using Twitter if they want to see a new product – ‘mayochup’ – in grocery stores. Millions of people voted yes for the mash-up, and Heinz has said it will produce a new sauce.

There is a controversy about mayochup though. Claims that Heinz has invented a new condiment has been disputed. Other countries have long used the combined condiment in their cultures and foods. A combination of mayo-ketchup is popular across Latin America and in the Caribbean. However, there is no similar product available in the wider U.S. market. (A close cousin might be Fry Sauce, very popular in parts of the U.S. and around the world, where it is considered a staple condiment on the table.)

If you don’t like the mayochup name, Heinz is taking suggestions for alternative names. Maybe ‘ketchannaise’ will catch on instead!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the four primary marketing strategies: market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification.
  2. Show information about mayochup:
    1. Twitter: https://twitter.com/HeinzKetchup_US/status/984133260216332302
    2. Mayochup news video: https://youtu.be/C-ZYv-TDh3Y
  3. Which strategy is Heinz using for this product? Why?
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team select one of the four different strategies and explain why that strategy could be used to market mayochup.
  5. Have each team determine the marketing mix (4Ps) to support their strategy choice.
  6. Debrief the exercise.

Source: Schmidt, S. (13 April, 2018). Heinz promotes its new ‘mayochup’ and sparks an international controversy. Washington Post.

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities