Tag Archives: experiential marketing

The Sound of a Brand

Sound

We all know that companies spend a great deal of money to build a brand and awareness. We can picture the brands – a graphic, a color, an icon. There are many visual components such as logo, color, type face, and graphics that go into the development of a brand visual. But why stop at a visual? Why not go beyond sight and into the realm of sound?

Brandsonics, a process from Cincinnati-based company Sound Images, works to build a sound and music that is identifiable to brands. The company’s process uses up to 42 different brand characteristics and distills these to five essential brand dimensions. These are then matched with an appropriate sound. The results might indicate the brand sound needs string instruments, or a specific beat, or a melody, or a voice.

Consider the various ways brands communicate with customers. Now, add a few beats and get ready to sing along.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the various components used to establish a brand and build awareness. What are the elements that are used to build a brand?
  2. Show the Bransonics video: http://www.soundimages.com/brandsonics/
  3. As a class, discuss what elements might help a company determine a signature sound.
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team select a brand and discuss the brand personality and characteristics to match the elements for a signature sound.
  5. Have the teams find a sample of music that could be used for the brand.

Source: Ad Age Daily

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My iPhone Smells like Popcorn

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The smell of popcorn is one of the world’s most enticing scents. Walk by a microwave that is popping corn and it is nearly impossible not to salivate. The folks at Pop Secret know that smell is an important part of the entire popcorn experience.

 

Pop Secret has recently launched a mobile phone attachment, called Pop Dongle, that gives consumers the sweet-and-salty smell of popcorn when they are playing the brand’s mobile game, Poptopia. Whenever a player swipes the butter inside the game 9which asks players to pop corn kernels), the Pop Dongle spritzes a scent of popcorn. It works by adding a device (dongle) into the audio jack of an iPhone or iPod Touch; the game uses a certain frequency signaling it to spread the smell of popcorn.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the importance of demonstrating a product, including tasting and smelling: experiential marketing.
  2. Bring up the Pop Secret web site: http://popsecret.com/poptopia/
  3. The Poptopia app can be found on iTunes.
  4. Next, show the video demonstrating the Pop Secret Dongle: http://youtu.be/SgJ7pqja7XY
  5. Discuss the competitors to Pop Secret.
  6. Divide students into teams and have teach compare the competitors. How does this product create a point of difference? What other ways are there to create a point of difference for the company?
  7. Debrief the exercise by showing the students’ points on the white board.

Source:  Ad Age Daily, 12/6/13

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Make product claims real – Febreze in New York

 

Let’s face it – we as consumers do not always believe the claims that are made by companies in advertisements. We are skeptical when companies make grandiose claims about how great their products are: brighter, fresher, cleaner, lovelier, sexier, smarter, healthier, and all that jazz. We want to see the proof – or in the case of Febreze, we want to smell the proof.

To prove the point about Febreze eliminating bad odors, they created a “live smell test lab.” Using a container that had been used to ship seafood, it was dropped into the Meatpacking District of New York city. With a window in place, lots of Febreze plug-ins, and some furniture, unsuspecting people were approached on nearby streets, blindfolded, brought to the container, and asked to identify the smells and location where they were at. The responses lived up to Frebreze’s claims on eliminating odors and making the room smell fresh.

The folks handling the marketing at Proctor & Gamble for Febreze understand consumer behavior. Consumers trust our own experiences – and even other consumers – long before they trust a company’s claim.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Ask students to think of advertising claims from products. (e.g., new and improved, cleaner, whiter clothes, fresher breath, etc.)
  2. Do they believe these claims? Why or why not?
  3. Show the Febreze video clip: http://creativity-online.com/work/febreze-live-commercial/27528
  4. Will this be effective in proving the company’s message? What else could be done?
  5. Have the student list a number of product categories for items found in their homes.
  6. Next, ask students to apply the concepts Febreze used to other household products.
  7. Using this type of experiential marketing approach, how could similar promotions be conducted for other household products?

Source:  Advertising Age, 5/9/12

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