Tag Archives: Communication

Marketing Campaigns for Nonprofit Organizations

Marketing for a nonprofit organization can present challenges to marketers. While basic marketing principles follow the same guidelines for products, there are differences in marketing for organizations that are nonprofits providing critical services, versus products from for-profit organizations. For-profit organizations can focus marketing messages on the delivered value and benefits of the products for the consumers. It’s relatively clear-cut.

On the other hand, nonprofits have a wider audience and often have no tangible product that can be delivered to its supporters. And, instead of more easily identified consumers, nonprofits must attract and retain donors who may be giving funds only when the spirit moves them. These are not necessity purchases per se; they are donations given to support something that is important to the donor. While donors and consumers can both be considered target markets, donors are driven by passion and causes rather than immediate needs and wants. They psychology is different.

Nonprofits need to use compelling visual marketing to appeal to donors. Top nonprofit marketers use powerful videos and photos of those whose lives will be changed by the organization. Testimonials and infographics are also important tools along with clear, targeted communications in order to retain the donors. A disaster may drive donations to quickly mount, but how are the donors retained over time?

Social media is an important tool for nonprofits to reach and engage donors. Branding is also critical to build and maintain a clear identity. And, social media campaigns have the added benefit of possibly going viral. Remember the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge? That was one of the top campaigns ever produced, generating $115 million in the summer of 2014 and garnered celebrity participation and donations.

All that from a bucket of ice.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the importance of marketing for nonprofits.
  2. Show several nonprofit campaigns:
    1. Make a wish: https://www.youtube.com/user/MakeAWishFoundation
    2. Water is life – 1st world problems: https://youtu.be/fxyhfiCO_XQ
    3. Project life jacket: https://www.facebook.com/ProjectLifeJacket/
    4. Truth: https://twitter.com/truthorange
    5. Water Aid: https://www.wateraid.org/us/get-involved/give-a-shit-donation-country-page
    6. World Wildlife Fund: https://twitter.com/wwf
    7. ALS Ice bucket challenge: http://www.alsa.org/fight-als/ice-bucket-challenge.html
  3. Divide students into teams and have each team select five different nonprofit organizations that they admire.
  4. Have each team delve more deeply into one of the nonprofits, making sure that each team has a different organization.
  5. Finally, have students develop a storyboard for a nonprofit organization.

Source: Allen, Z. (15 August 2019). 8 top nonprofit online campaigns that rocked social media. Socialbrite.org.

 

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Is Privacy a thing of the Past?

Privacy. It is such a critical topic, yet it is also one that many consumers feel helpless about fixing. Who knows what we buy? What we want? Where we go? Well, as it turns out there a great number of companies, and government agencies, tracking us. And it is not limited to our purchasing behavior. There are a number of companies that can and do track the daily activities of employees also.

Everyone says they want privacy, but many people are unwilling or don’t know how to protect their online privacy. The issue is one that reaches beyond the individual and extends to the larger society. It encompasses devices including home security, smart phones, wearable devices, facial recognition, home speakers, smart TVs, automobiles, maps, social media, and more! And the crazy thing is that we often give permission to be tracked without realizing the implications to our privacy.

This is an issue that extends beyond consumer behavior and can also encompass how companies track employee behavior, beginning when we wake up and check our work email at home, and continuing monitoring activities throughout the day to track physical and online movement. Granted, some of the tracking is useful to protect against espionage and theft, but does it go too far?

Who’s watching who do what?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the issue of privacy in the Internet age. What are students’ concerns?
  2. There are several very compelling interactive graphics and videos that help illustrate this topic. Show these in class and have students take notes on each.
    1. It’s time to panic about privacy: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/04/10/opinion/internet-data-privacy.html?emc=edit_ct_20190411&nl=technology&nlid=6570397720190411&te=1
    2. Meet ‘Chet.’ His employer knows what time he work up today: https://www.wsj.com/graphics/company-tracking-employees/?mod=djemfoe
    3. Microchips for employees video: https://youtu.be/eX1KNlI40V8
  3. Discussion: Is privacy important? What can be done to protect individuals?
  4. Consider assigning students to research this topic. A number of interesting reports can be found at various sources.

Source: Bentley, E. and Krouse, S. (19 July 2019). Meet ‘Chet.’ His employer knows what time he woke up today. Wall Street Journal; Manjoo, J. (11 April 2019). It’s time to panic about privacy. New York Times.

 

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Employees Tell the Best Places to Work

Looking for a job can be intimidating and confusing. Companies (just like prospective employees) try to put their best foot forward to convince you that they are the best place for you to grow and deploy your talents. But, that is not always true. Working for a company that isn’t a good fit can be a miserable and negative experience for employees.

So, where should I job candidate look for information about a company? Try asking a companies’ current (and previous) employees for information. One such source for this type of information is the Employees’ Choice Awards from Glassdoor. These awards are based on the input from at least 75 employees at a company, and covers topics such as work environment, pay, and more. The list covers the best 100 companies to work for in 2019, as well as best cities for jobs, and highest paying jobs.

This year’s top companies to work for include:

  1. Bain & Company
  2. Zoom Video Communications
  3. In-N-Out Burger
  4. Procore Technologies
  5. Boston Consulting Group
  6. LinkedIn
  7. Facebook
  8. Google
  9. Lululemon
  10. Southwest Airlines

Where do you want to work?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Suggestion: For this discussion, invite someone from the campus career services center to attend class and moderate the discussion.
  2. Discuss what makes a job and company rewarding. What companies are they interested in working at?
  3. Divide students into teams. Have each team develop a list of the 10 things they want from a job.
  4. Build the list on the white board. Where are the common themes?
  5. A brief video can be found at: https://youtu.be/s5BuPaNCbiE
  6. The full report is at: https://www.glassdoor.com/Award/Best-Places-to-Work-LST_KQ0,19.htm
  7. Give students time to explore the site and companies. Now, where are they interested in working?

Source: Protalinksi, E. (4 December 2018). Glassdoor: Zoom dethrones Facebook as the best tech company to work for in the U.S. Venture Beat.

 

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