Tag Archives: children

Mealtime Bribery

It can be tough to get kids to eat their vegetables. (College students might not have this problem, but parents certainly do.) Let’s face it. Most kids would rather have candy, or soda, or French fries, or anything other than eat parent-endorsed healthy foods. What’s a parent to do?

One solution is of course an all-out battle with consequences for not eating healthy. But another solution could be to use bribery! In other words, “If you eat your vegetables, you get a treat.” And maybe that treat could be Ore Ida’s French fries…

And, since not all parents are comfortable with the idea of bribery to encourage good behavior, Ore Ida wisely renamed the practice as ‘Potato Pay’. It’s pretty simple. Set an exchange rate (aka bribe) for each healthy food that kids eat. Broccoli could be worth two fries, carrots equal one fry, and Brussel sprouts are worth five fries! The exchange rate can even vary depending on the child and vegetable. Don’t struggle – pay with French fries.

What’s the exchange rate in your house?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Were they picky eaters? Do they have young cousins or siblings who always present a challenge at meal times? How did their families handle this?
  2. Show the potato pay video: https://youtu.be/x8ZUvU_SW-I
  3. Web site: http://www.trypotatopay.com/
  4. Suggested mealtime bribery chart: http://www.trypotatopay.com/MealtimeBriberyChart.pdf
  5. Have students analyze how Ore Ida created a full campaign.
  6. Divide students into groups. Challenge each group to identify a problem faces by parents at meal time.
  7. What is a creative solution that a food company could use to market its products to solve the problem?

Source: Griner, D. (13 July 2018). Kids won’t eat veggies? Bribe them shamelessly with Ore-Ida’s ‘Potato Pay’.

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Funko Launches Cereal Brand

Successful brand extensions can be a tricky to accomplish. Brands usually have a strong identity, and are often associated with a single or unique product line. Extending the brand into a new area or industry can be difficult, expensive, and not always successful. The best brand extensions stay true to their original brand identity and market spaces. For example, Coca-Cola can take its strong global brand to include beverages other than sodas, but it would certainly struggle to extend its brand to a new industry such as entertainment.

A new brand extension is underway by Funko, known for its Pop! bobblehead toys and characters. The new entry by Funko is for a line of cereals – FunkO’s – that will have a retro flair and (of course) include a toy collectible in the boxes. The first line will have more than 40 characters and each cereal will have an exclusive U.S. retail partner (not at grocery stores).

The cereals arrive this summer with a suggested retail price of $7.99. The cereal product line will continue the Funko tradition of distributing collectible figures with fun designs. Each cereal box will include mini Pocket Pop! figures and the packaging will have activities, puzzles, and games.

The first releases are expected in July and August, and include:

  • Mega man FunkO’s (at GameStop)
  • Cuphead & Mugman FunkO’s (at Hot Topic)
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street’s Freddy Krueger FunkO’s (at f.y.e.)
  • The Lord of the Ring’s Gollum FunkO’s (at Box Lunch)
  • Beetlejuice FunkO’s (and Box Lunch)
  • Huckleberry Hound FunkO’s (at Funko.com)

Let’s grab a box, munch, and watch cartoons!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Who eats cereal? What type? Who buys Funko products?
  2. Show Funko’s Web site and the new product line: https://www.funko.com/blog/article/introducing-funko-s-putting-the-fun-back-in-breakfast
  3. Discuss competition: what are the direct competitors for this product? Indirect competitors?
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team compare FunkO cereal product with a competitive product. What are the points of difference (what makes FunkO cereal different from competition)?
  5. Debrief the exercise.

Source: Guess who’s coming to breakfast? This summer, FunkO’s cereal. (2 July 2018). Brandchannel.com

 

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Fund-Raising with Healthy Options

We can usually tell when it is fund-raising season for schools and sports. Kids stop by houses and businesses, selling chocolate bars and other items to help fund a variety of programs and causes. And, although we happily buy and eat the candy, there can be some regrets over the empty calories, and the lack of sales going to local businesses. Wouldn’t it be better to offer healthy alternatives, and support local businesses? Of course! Enter a new company: FarmRaiser – connects fundraising groups with local products and foods.

FarmRaiser was founded in Michigan with a mission to connect local farmers and food artisans with schools, athletic teams, bands, and other causes. Vendors must meet standards for sustainable practices, and artisan products that do NOT list sugar as the first ingredient are welcome. The company states that “if a product has more than five or six ingredients, and if any of them are ones your grandma wouldn’t recognize it doesn’t make the cut.”

Campaigns are customized by working with a FarmRaiser “cultivator” to help determine fund-raiser goals, local products, and vendors. Each campaign also gets its own Web page on FarmRaiser.com. The company estimates that 85% of funds raised stays in the community; the average profit margin is 53% for the groups. The process is straightforward: once the cause is registered, FarmRaiser helps create a custom online and mobile market. At the end of the sale period, students help distribute the produce and products to their customers. Groups can choose various products and goods from multiple regions. Try combining Michigan cherries, with Texas Salsa.

What sounds good to you?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the fundraising activities that students might have done. Discuss what was it about, proceeds, products, process, etc.
  2. Introduce the topic of changing the product mix and sales process.
  3. Show a video about the company: https://vimeo.com/147806697
  4. Show Web site: https://www.farmraiser.com/
  5. Divide students into team. Have each team select a cause and develop a product set.
  6. Set SMART objectives for the company.

Source: Rieth, D. (Summer 2018). Home field advantage. Edible Michiana.

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