Tag Archives: design

Google Glass Evolves and Repositions

Remember Google Glass? Google Glass had a short life; it was pulled from the market in 2015 amidst complaints about technology, usefulness, price, and privacy. The original product was focused on consumers as wearable technology. The glasses had a smart heads-up display and camera, allowing users to connect to data and share information and images.

However, Alphabet (Google’s parent company) has now relaunched the product as Glass Enterprise Edition (EE). The new Glass EE is being repositioned into the enterprise/industrial market as wearable tech for workers. Alphabet has been testing Glass EE at locations for companies including Boeing, General Electric, Volkswagen, Samsung, Sutter Health, and DHL.

The Glass EE looks similar to the original, but has a better camera, extended battery life, faster Wi-Fi and processor, and has a new red light that turns on when recording. The electronics are now modular in the shape of a pod which can be detached and reattached to any frame, including safety goggles.

How useful are they? GE reported a 46% decrease in time for certain activities, and 85% of the workers believe the system will help reduce mistakes. Glass EE is sold exclusively through Glass Partners. Prices vary depending on the software customization, customer support, and training.

It’s tough to reposition a failed product, but Glass EE seems ready for an entirely new market.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Review key aspects of developing a product positioning map, including determining the axis labels for positioning.
  2. Review Glass EE product: https://www.x.company/glass/
  3. What products are competitors (direct and indirect)?
  4. Divide students into teams and have each team develop a positioning map for Glass. Start with the original Google Glass, and then reposition for the Glass EE product.
  5. Have each team draw their map on the board.
  6. Debrief exercise.

Source: Wired, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, other news sources

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Farewell to the iPod

The iPod is officially dead. Yes, you read this correctly. After 16 years, with more than 400 million units sold worldwide, Apple has pulled the plug on the iPod Nano and Shuffle, removing the product line from its online stores. To many people, the iPod was a revolutionary device. The portable device with its iconic white headphones enabled people to take their full music library anywhere, giving listeners control of playlists and music.

iPod launched in 2001 with a unit holding 5 GB of data for $399, quickly followed in 2002 with a 10 GB unit at $499. Things really changed when Apple launched the iTunes Music Store in 2003, setting off a landslide in music downloads as well as music piracy concerns. In 2007, Apple launched the iPhone, which included capabilities beyond just making phone calls, incorporating music capabilities in the phone.

How many iPods have you owned?

R.I.P. iPod. You changed the world of music.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the stages in the product life cycle. What are the marketing objectives in each stage?
  2. Divide students into teams. Have each team draw a product life cycle and place various products and services into each stage.
  3. Next, discuss the iPod and it’s journey through the product life cycle: http://www.macworld.com/article/1053499/home-tech/ipodtimeline.html
  4. Show Apple’s online store: https://www.apple.com/. What product line is missing from the store?
  5. Poll students: Who had an iPod? What do they use now for music?
  6. Show first iPod commercial: https://youtu.be/mE_bDNaYAr8
  7. Next, have students brainstorm on how to reposition or revise products/services to that they can move into an earlier stage of the life cycle.

Source:  Wired, other news sources

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Happy Birthday, iPhone!

While it might feel like smart phones have always been part of our lives, they are still relatively young in years. The Apple iPhone just turned 10 in June, and it’s interesting to look back and see how mobile devices have changed how people communicate and shop. What was once a high-tech oddity is now a permanent fixture in the average person’s life.

Consider how the iPhone and smart phones have changed the daily landscape.

According to Pew Research:

  • 77% of U.S. adults now own a smartphone
  • 51% of young adults’ homes contain 3+ smartphones
  • Smartphones are used for more than calling and texting
  • 51% of U.S. adults use smartphones to make online purchases
  • 20% of households below $30,000 income are smartphone-only Internet users.
  • 55% of smartphone owners get news alerts on their phones
  • 28% of owners do not use a screen lock to secure their phones
  • Ownership is climbing in developing countries, but there is a digital divide in ownership

How do you use your smartphone?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: What type of smart phone do they have? What age did they first get a smart phone? What was it like?
  2. Ask students to list 10 things that they use their phones for each day.
  3. Build a full list on the white board to review with the class.
  4. Show the research article from Pew: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/06/28/10-facts-about-smartphones/?utm_source=Pew+Research+Center&utm_campaign=3a5800a955-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_06_22&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3e953b9b70-3a5800a955-399503221
  5. Discuss the components of a situation analysis: company, general industry, trends, key competitors, technology, legal, etc.
  6. Divide students into teams. Have each team use laptops to do general research to answer the environmental factors above.
  7. What should smartphone companies do to adjust to these factors?

Source:  Pew Research

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