Tag Archives: design

Innovation: An Amphibious Prosthetic Leg

In 2004, U.S. Marine Corp. veteran Dan Lasko lost his left leg while serving in Afghanistan. Unfortunately, he is far from the only casualty of war; roughly 6% of all injured veterans have lost a limb. This makes it critical to innovate new solutions to help veterans return to an active lifestyle.

An active lifestyle was very important to Dan Lasko; the 33-year old has two young sons and all are active swimmers. But Lasko faced a unique problem in that that amputees cannot easily swim; prosthetics legs are not designed to go between land and water in a functional way.

In a collaboration between Northwell Health, J. Walter Thompson New York, and Lasko, the team designed and developed an amphibious prosthetic leg. Using extensive design and testing, “The Fin” was developed – 3-D-printed prosthetic leg that can help one naturally walk into the water, swim, and even dive.

Innovation changes lives.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the steps of the innovation process.
  2. Students: What are the critical factors to successfully developing a new product?
  3. Show the video of The Fin’s development: https://youtu.be/m8KmWGZvkI4
  4. More information is also available at: https://www.northwell.edu/about/news/press-releases/northwell-returns-amputees-water-creating-first-3d-printed-amphibious-prosthetic-leg
  5. There are numerous other innovations that are focused on improving lives. Divide students into teams and have team search for a similar problem, and solution, to the one discussed in this case.

Source: Ad Week  

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Fun with Transit Ads

Marketers constantly face a challenge to be both strategic and creative. It can be difficult to define the target market and then work out how to set your message apart from the thousands of competing messages. Sure, we all know how effective Super Bowl ads and social media can be, but don’t forget about the old-fashioned kinds of promotion, too.

For example, the simple bus or transit shelter makes a great place to build awareness and a lasting impression. Bus shelters are ubiquitous – they can found in almost every market in the world. Outdoor advertising delivers great visibility at a low price per impression. Transit displays don’t have to be boring – in fact, they are more creative than every thanks to the use of technology.

The displays can be three-dimensional, colorful, and interactive with the audience. And, since they are available 24/7 they cannot be turned off or ignored. No zip, zap, or mute. The large displays are seen by thousands of transit riders, pedestrians, and drivers. And, since most people take the same route to work every day, the ads are seen multiple times per person, helping to build awareness.

Look around on your next drive to stroll through town. What do you see?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the role of outdoor (and out-of-home) advertising.
  2. Poll students: What bus shelters do they remember seeing in the past few days?
  3. Show these bus stop ads:

http://www.adweek.com/creativity/20-clever-bus-shelter-ads-brighten-your-travels-133561/

  1. Additional, interactive bus shelters:

https://youtu.be/cRzJ1Pcj-cA

https://youtu.be/_Uj-MMAys4M

  1. Divide students into teams. Have each team design a bus shelter for a product of their choice. This can either be a fast in-class project, or a longer take-home project in teams.
  2. Have each team show their bus shelter display.
  3. Additional work: Have students research the costs of transit shelter displays in various markets.

Source: Ad Week  

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Register Robot System in Japan

Do you ever get tired of waiting in line to check out of a grocery store? In the future, the check-out process will be streamlined, using more robotic registers. Recently, Panasonic teamed with Lawson food stores in Japan for a trial run of its new robotic check-out system. The “Reji-Robo” robotic check-out uses RFID tags to scan the items in a shopper’s basket, and then even bags the groceries automatically. (RFID tags are thin, small electronics components that wirelessly communicate within a short distance.)

Panasonic’s robotic check-out is somewhat similar to Amazon Go’s concept store in Seattle. However, with Reji-Robo, customers get a sensor-equipped basket when they walk into the stores, then choose items and place them into the smart basket. In a step beyond Amazon Go, the Panasonic basket once placed in to the robotic check-out system, automatically computes the transaction, the bottom of the basket opens, and the items are automatically lowered into plastic bags for the shopper.

The RFID system also holds promise to speed up the supply chain, increase accuracy, improve productivity, and improve inventory control and tracking.

What’s in your basket?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss some of the more frustrating and costly parts of retail and shopping.
  2. Show the Panasonic video: https://youtu.be/Hpp-3Ver7ig
  3. If students are not familiar with Amazon Go, view the video and concept at: https://www.amazon.com/b?node=16008589011#
  4. Discuss the four primary marketing strategies: market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification.
  5. Which strategy is Panasonic using for this product? Why?
  6. Divide students into teams. Have each team select one of the four different strategies and explain why that strategy could be used to market robotic check-out systems.

Source: Brandchannel.com

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