Tag Archives: shopping

Pizza Baby Registry

After the wedding, come the babies, right? Perhaps not always that way, but this is certainly the case for Domino’s Pizza. Nine months ago (!) the company started a wedding registry for guests who want to give the happy couple pizza parties and party food. Now that the wedding festivities are over, Domino’s still wants to remain involved in the new couple’s life by offering an online baby registry through Gugu Guru.

The new parents-in-waiting can create their own baby gift registry for Domino’s pizza, foods, and gifts, including:

  • Hormonal and Hangry pizza
  • The Gender Reveal pizza
  • Pregnancy food pack
  • ‘Dadchelor’ Party food
  • Baby goods such as onesies, mugs, tumblers, shirts (Pizza for Two), and more…

And for a limited time, Domino’s also has a big contest give-away for new parents to win pizza for a year, plus a line of baby and parent gifts.

What were you expecting?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss pizza delivery in general.
  2. In which stage of the product life cycle is pizza delivery?
  3. Show the Domino’s baby registry: http://www.dominosbabyregistry.com/
  4. A brief video can be viewed at: https://youtu.be/N6eeNUQvPqc
  5. Next, divide students into teams.
  6. Have each team select a product or service that is in the mature stage of the product life cycle. What can be done to extend the life cycle and increase sales?

Source:  Domino’s Pizza (2017, Nov. 29)

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Home Delivery – Inside of the Doorway

Consumers are used to ordering goods online and then having packages waiting on the doorstep when they get home. It’s convenient, but sometimes it’s messy when packages are exposed to rain or snow, or when the neighbor dog plays hide-and-seek with the package, or if someone targets the house for a convenient theft while we’re at work. Sure, we can ask the neighbor to keep an eye out, but what if the neighbor isn’t home, or misses the action? While the costs of package theft has not been measured, one can assume the expense of stolen packages adds up for the shippers – and for the buyers.

Ecommerce companies have been working on solutions. Jet.com (owned by Walmart) is using a smart lock made by Latch to provide one-time home entry by using a code. And now Amazon has gotten into the game with Amazon Key – a $250 service that includes a smart camera made by Amazon coupled with a smart door lock made by Yale or Kwikset.

When the delivery arrives, the lock verifies that the driver is at the correct address and at the correct time. Amazon Key then starts recording video, unlocks the door, and records the entire delivery. It can even grant access to the home to other services such as Merry Maids (housecleaning) and Rover.com (dog walking).

Amazon key is currently available in 37 cities and is open to Prime members (who already pay $99/year for fast shipping and other services).

What will you have delivered?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss some of the problems that consumers have with delivery of packages.
  2. Show links and videos of Amazon Key:

Link: https://www.amazon.com/b?&node=17285120011&ref_=pe_3455630_258731250_em_ecg_bor_bs_ann_func

Kit: https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-Key-Home-Kit-compatible/dp/B00KCYQGXE

  1. Also show Latch’s solution:

https://www.latch.com/

  1. How does this service benefit consumers?
  2. Poll students: Would they use this service for deliveries? Why or why not?
  3. How should these services be marketed? Who is the ideal customer?

 

Source: New York Times, Wall Street Journal, other news sources

 

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The Variation of Vending Machines

 

Consider the humble vending machines. They are virtually everywhere, and we do mean everywhere. We see them in stores, hallways, offices, subway stations, laundry mats, gas stations, and more. Not only are the vending machines everywhere, but they are easy to use, can take cash or cards, and consumers do not have to interact with a cashier or sales person. Easy. Fast. Convenient.

Now, how does something that is so ubiquitous become something unique? It starts with the application of the machine and the market it serves.  What is needed? Who needs it? Where and when do they need the products?

Even established brick-and-mortar stores contain vending machines. Recently, CVS Pharmacy began installing vending machines in various locations containing convenient necessities, healthy snacks, and personal care products. The vending machines are customized with offerings to fit each location, including products such as over-the-counter remedies, beauty and personal care products, vitamins, supplements, snacks, beverages, and more. The machines will be located in airports, public transit stations, office parks, and college campuses.

San Francisco-based company Bodega places small, automated machines in offices, apartments, college campuses, and more. Using an app makes it easy to reach inside the vending machine, take what is needed, and then be automatically billed.

But perhaps no location has as many vending machines as Japan, with an estimated total of 5 million machines nationwide (out of 17 million machines worldwide). They carry something for everyone – from bananas to flying fish soup!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Where are vending machines? What do they buy form vending machines? Why buy from vending machines?
  2. Show Bodega’s Web site and video: https://www.bodega.ai/
  3. There are many videos of vending machines on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ZZmUuRG87sU
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team select a market and design a vending machine to meet that market’s needs.
  5. Have each team present their concept and let the class vote on the most realistic idea.

Source: New York Times, Fast Company, Business Insider, Retail Customer Experience

 

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