Tag Archives: consumer behavior

Changing Cigarette Packaging

Does packaging make a difference? With the recent change in European regulations for cigarette packaging, the tobacco companies hope that packaging doesn’t matter, while consumer health advocates hope it does make a difference.

The change in Europe is new EU legislation that determines how tobacco products are manufactured, produced, and sold across Europe. The revised rules, named the Tobacco Products Directive, ban flavored cigarettes as well as describe standardized packaging of tobacco products to minimize the impact of brand images, logos, colors, and names. The result is a standard package with sickly colors, standardized font and text, and very unattractive images of how smoking impacts consumers’ health.

Since packaging is part of marketing and advertising, the new regulations remove brand features and increase the size and type of health warnings. It is hoped that the new packaging will reduce the attractiveness of smoking, particularly to young people.

Will the new packaging matter?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Who smokes, how much, when did they start?
  2. Discuss the role of packaging in branding and advertising.
  3. View the EU Tobacco Products Directive Web site: https://ec.europa.eu/health/tobacco/products_en
  4. View video about the directive: https://youtu.be/UPNwVsj1bCw
  5. Discuss the new packaging with students. How might it impact consumer behavior? Would the new package change any of their habits?

Source:  Brandchannel.com

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

Economics of Airline Class Seating

Plane fares are frustrating. From the time someone searches for a flight in the morning, until they book it later in the week (or day), the price changes. And don’t even get started about how little leg-room and seat space there is in the economy class section! But then again, the economy class is not how airlines make money. How does an airline make money on fares?

First class and premium cabin seats!

Here is an example of a flight’s pricing: British Airways 777, round-trip, non-stop between London and Wash. D.C.

  • 224 seats total
  • 122 economy seats @ $876/seat = $106,872
  • 40 premium economy seats @ $2,633/seat = $105,320
  • 48 business class seats @ $6,723/seat = $322,704
  • 14 first class seats @ $8,715/seat = $122,010

The front sections of the plane account for 45% of the seats, but generate 84% of the revenue! While this model does not always hold true, in general airlines get 66% of revenue from the premium, business, and first-class seats.

In essence, airlines are able to sell the same service (transportation) to different people, at vastly different prices (enhanced amenities and the onboard experience). Airlines realized that passengers could be segmented into two categories: tourists, and business people.

What else will future air travel hold?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Pricing is usually a complex topic. Discuss the six steps for pricing (determining objectives, estimating demand, determining cost/profit relationships, select price level, set list price, and make adjustments).
  2. Discuss the various pricing models in class: demand-oriented, cost-oriented, profit-oriented, and competition-oriented.
  1. Show this video that explains the basic economics of airfare:
  2. https://youtu.be/BzB5xtGGsTc
  3. Draw the price structure on the board.
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team work on a possible re-design of planes to address more market segments.

Source: Wendover Productions, YouTube

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

Fender Teaches Guitar Online

While not everyone is a musician, many other people have longed to learn a musical instrument. Some people do learn, but many others stop learning and playing way too soon. According to research from Fender Guitars, 45% of guitar sales are generated by people who have never used one before – but 95% of people who try guitar give it up in the first year. That dramatically lowers overall industry sales, and gives Fender an opportunity.

Fender Guitar has a new plan to help people learn how to play classics such as The Star Spangled Banner and  other songs. The key is to get future guitarists engaged quickly. The Fender Play web site has a guided curriculum so that students can pick the style of music they want to learn, and then immediately get instruction on songs from that genre. Fender Play includes:

  • A guided learning path for your musical style
  • Hundreds of lessons
  • High quality, close-up videos
  • New songs and lessons added regularly
  • Artists such as Foo Fighters, Elvis, U2, The Lumineers, and more

The service starts with a free 30-day trial period, followed by a  fee of $19.99 per month. Fender Play is not limited to its own guitar players. Any guitar student can learn to play on their own instrument (but, of course Fender hopes to create future good will towards its company).

What are you waiting for? Pick up that six-string and go!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Who plays guitar? Who used to play guitar? Who wants to play guitar? What keeps them from playing guitar?
  2. Show FenderPlay site: https://www.fender.com/play
  3. Optional: Additional videos to show:

https://youtu.be/h6ada1kvgEw

https://youtu.be/jnkppFj5Ri4

https://youtu.be/GSvQOodrEpA

https://youtu.be/T4lFt2JWrXk

  1. Discuss the four primary marketing strategies: market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification.
  2. Which strategy is Fender using for this product? Why?
  3. Divide students into teams. Have each team select one of the four different strategies and explain why that strategy could be used to market Fender guitars.
  4. Have each team determine the marketing mix (4Ps) to support their strategy choice.

Source:  Brandchannel.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities