Tag Archives: marketing mix

Is this a good deal?

Everyone loves a deal. Just showing a sign with “50% off!” can get shoppers racing to the store to rack up credit card points. But is that perceived ‘deal’ really a deal? Or is it a ploy? And, do shoppers always make the right choices when comparing pricing options? Oftentimes, shoppers do not make the lowest-cost choice, but instead fall prey to their own mathematical errors.

Answer this: Which is a better deal for a $6, 6-ounce product:

  • Option (a): 33% off the regular price, or
  • Option (b) 33% more product for the regular price?

At a quick glance, it appears the two deals are equivalent. But are they? No.

  • Option (a) $6 – 33% discount ($1.98) = $4.02, divided by 6 ounces = $0.67/ounce.
  • Option (b) 6 ounces plus 33% more volume (1.98 ounce) = 7.98 ounces, divided by $6 = $1.33/ounce.

In order for the two options to be truly equivalent, the price discount of 33% must be countered by a quantity increase of 50%.

This is a common scene for product discounts in stores. Generally, consumers prefer product bonuses instead of price discounts, even though these do not offer the same benefit.

Go ahead and try to make these calculations in your head! Then, carefully examine the promotions offered by retailers before making your final decision.

Which promotion would you use?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. This activity is a good time to set students loose in stores on a field trip.
  2. Divide students into teams. Have each team walk through a local store to determine how prices are advertised and shown in stores. They can compare the shelf price with prices found in sales flyers (usually at store entrances).
  3. As they wander the store, have students find examples of products that are offering a discount, or offering an extra portion in the package. (They can use smart phones to take photos of the examples.)
  4. What pricing strategies are being use?
  5. Do they always make the lower-cost choice?
  6. Debrief the exercise.

Source:  McGinty, J. (3 August 2018). 50% off: Why that deal isn’t as good as you think. Wall Street Journal.

 

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Armpit Advertising

Do you ride the subway or other public transportation? Do you notice the ads in the cars, or do you tune out everyone and everything, particularly the stinky armpits of fellow travelers on crowded trains? Well, in what might possibly be the weirdest place ever for an advertisement, a Japanese company is charging clients roughly $90 per hour to place advertisements on armpits. Yes, you read this correctly – armpit advertising is now a thing.

Wakino Ad Company (“Waki” is the Japanese word for “armpit”) is placing the ads on the underarms of both female and male models for beauty company Liberta, whose product mix includes armpit creams. Wakino is also running a national armpit beauty contest to promote the new areas of advertisements.

While the armpit ads might seem strange, people have long used spaces on their vehicles and bodies to promote products. There have been cases where advertisements have been placed on bald heads, faces, thighs, and other body areas. For armpit ads, the sponsors could be for hair removal, dermatology, lotions, creams, and who know what else.

Go ahead and raise your arm in public – you could get paid.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Who takes public transportation? What ads do they notice?
  2. Discuss the various promotional tactics that can be used for marketing a product.
  3. Have students come up with tactics and list all the tactics on the white board (ex: billboards, print, direct mail, etc.).
  4. Now, introduce the armpit advertisements: https://youtu.be/P54A9L-VyFg
  5. Divide the students into teams. Have each team list what products could be advertised in armpits?
  6. What other body locations could host ads? What products or services would they feature?

Source: Ad Week, CNN, other news sources

 

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Funko Launches Cereal Brand

Successful brand extensions can be a tricky to accomplish. Brands usually have a strong identity, and are often associated with a single or unique product line. Extending the brand into a new area or industry can be difficult, expensive, and not always successful. The best brand extensions stay true to their original brand identity and market spaces. For example, Coca-Cola can take its strong global brand to include beverages other than sodas, but it would certainly struggle to extend its brand to a new industry such as entertainment.

A new brand extension is underway by Funko, known for its Pop! bobblehead toys and characters. The new entry by Funko is for a line of cereals – FunkO’s – that will have a retro flair and (of course) include a toy collectible in the boxes. The first line will have more than 40 characters and each cereal will have an exclusive U.S. retail partner (not at grocery stores).

The cereals arrive this summer with a suggested retail price of $7.99. The cereal product line will continue the Funko tradition of distributing collectible figures with fun designs. Each cereal box will include mini Pocket Pop! figures and the packaging will have activities, puzzles, and games.

The first releases are expected in July and August, and include:

  • Mega man FunkO’s (at GameStop)
  • Cuphead & Mugman FunkO’s (at Hot Topic)
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street’s Freddy Krueger FunkO’s (at f.y.e.)
  • The Lord of the Ring’s Gollum FunkO’s (at Box Lunch)
  • Beetlejuice FunkO’s (and Box Lunch)
  • Huckleberry Hound FunkO’s (at Funko.com)

Let’s grab a box, munch, and watch cartoons!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: Who eats cereal? What type? Who buys Funko products?
  2. Show Funko’s Web site and the new product line: https://www.funko.com/blog/article/introducing-funko-s-putting-the-fun-back-in-breakfast
  3. Discuss competition: what are the direct competitors for this product? Indirect competitors?
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team compare FunkO cereal product with a competitive product. What are the points of difference (what makes FunkO cereal different from competition)?
  5. Debrief the exercise.

Source: Guess who’s coming to breakfast? This summer, FunkO’s cereal. (2 July 2018). Brandchannel.com

 

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