Tag Archives: Food

Dunkin’ Drops the Donuts from its Branding

What’s the importance of a brand name? Brands have value. Brands help to define a company, its values and products, and branding builds an image in the minds of consumers. If a consumer hears “Nike,” or “North Face,” or “Luluemon” it immediate builds a picture in the consumer’s mind of that brand. So, when an established company undertakes rebranding, it had better be prepared for a lot of work and time to establish the new brand. The rebranding can be incredibly expensive and risky.

The latest rebranding is a move from “Dunkin’ Donuts” to just “Dunkin’.” The company claims that it has been on a first-name basis with its fan for a long time, and that its customers have long referred to the brand as Dunkin’, making this a natural fit. The original pink and orange colors of the logo, along with the original font, have been retained in the new logo, helping to retain the brand recognition.

Dropping the “Donuts” raises the question about whether Dunkin’ will be moving away from its core product in favor of a newer food menu (croissants, bagels?). The company claims that donuts are still a key focus for Dunkin’.

Dunkin’ isn’t the only brand to shorten its name. Recently, Weight Watchers shortened its name to WW, using the tagline “Wellness that Works” to help explain the rebranding. And, many people still erroneously refer to Kentucky Fried Chicken with its full name, even though it became KFC in the early 1990s.

It’s hard to change consumers’ habits.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the importance of branding.
  2. Using the Top 100 Global Brands list as reference, poll students about the top 10 global brands: https://www.interbrand.com/best-brands/best-global-brands/2018/ranking/.
  3. Which brands do they think have been able to gain mind share? How?
  4. View the Dunkin’ Donuts web site: https://www.dunkindonuts.com/en
  5. What should the company do to roll out the new brand standards to consumers?

Source:  Advertising Age, New York Times, other news sources

 

 

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Sam’s Club Now Goes Cashier Free

Amazon isn’t the only company working on reinventing the retail experience. While the Amazon Go stores have captured consumers’ attention and shoppers at its cashier-less grocery stores, it’s not the only retailer interested in using technology to improve the customer shopping experience. Walmart recently announced that it is opening Sam’s Club Now, also cashier-less, in Dallas. The company describes its new store as a “technology lab that doubles as a live, retail club.” At 32,000 square feet it isn’t quite a compact store, but it is significantly smaller than the typical Sam’s Club store.

Similar to Amazon Go, in order to shop at Sam’s Club Now, members will need to use a Sam’s Club app that allows customers to scan UPC codes as they shop and check themselves out when done shopping. The app also includes smart shopping lists, in-store voice search and maps, augmented reality for new in-store experiences, and one-hour pickup.

Employees don’t go away – they instead shift to a new role called the Member Host. These associates are the face of the company and will use technology to help them serve Sam’s Club members better. Sam’s Club stated that the “future of retail is as much about people as it is about technology.”

If you’re in Dallas, check it out.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the use of innovation throughout retail.
  2. Review Sam’s Club Now announcement and video: https://corporate.samsclub.com/blog/2018/10/29/sams-club-now-reimagining-the-future-of-retail
  3. Compare this with Amazon Go: https://www.amazon.com/b?ie=UTF8&node=16008589011
  4. What are the similarities, and differences, between the two services?
  5. How should the two companies position against each other?

Source:  Advertising Age, New York Times, other news sources

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Baby Food Innovation

“Baby food.” Even the phrase itself brings to mind mushy, tasteless, pureed, prepared food. While that may have been true of the old-fashioned prepared baby foods, it certainly doesn’t apply to today’s offerings of fresh, organic, foods for babies. Today, new parents are turning to delivery-based meal services to help them save time on meal preparation, but still provide healthy, nutritious, and delicious foods for their families.

Meal preparation is a topic for all stages of family life. According to Pew Research, both parents work in nearly two-thirds of all U.S. households. And, with so much time spent at work, time in the kitchen is at a premium. This has given rise to a number of meal delivery services such as Home Chef, Blue Apron, Plated, and more. But all of these are focused on adults. What about meals for the babies? Meals for babies present a somewhat unique problem– babies can eat only a small amount at a time, meaning that the potential waste of food is quite high.

A number of start-up companies have entered the baby food arena. These companies offer a variety of prepared products including flash-frozen food pouches which contain portioned, chopped, ingredients to meet a baby’s nutritional needs. Other companies deliver cold-pressed fruit and vegetable food pouches in temperature-controlled packaging. And yet another provides tubs of cold-pressed baby purees, including a spoon and packaged in a reseal-able container.

Food matters.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the use prepared, delivered meals. Have students had an experience with these?
  2. Review key aspects of developing a product positioning map, including determining the axis labels for positioning.
  3. Divide students into teams and have each team review a baby food product company with respect to product, price, place, and promotion.
  4. Examples include:
    1. Raised Real: https://www.raisedreal.com/
    2. Once Upon a Farm: https://onceuponafarmorganics.com/
    3. Little Spoon: https://www.littlespoon.com/
    4. Gerber: https://www.gerber.com/products/baby-food
  5. Have each team develop a positioning map.
  6. Have each team draw their map on the board.
  7. Debrief exercise.

Source:  Painter, K. (29 September, 2018). When the jar isn’t enough: Baby food innovators are on a roll these days. Minneapolis Star Tribune.

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