Tag Archives: mobile marketing

On-Demand Fuel Services Deliver Direct to Cars

Has your car ever run out of gas? Has it ever “run on fumes” while you search for a nearby gas station? For most people, these events have likely happened a few times. Wouldn’t it be nice if your car automatically had its tank filled up without needing to take it to a filling station? And maybe get oil changes and wipers replaced without needing to spend hours at a repair shop? Well, a new company named Yoshi has the answer to this dilemma.

Yoshi is an on-site refueling and car maintenance service that brings gasoline and other services directly to your car. Using an app, drivers can schedule fuel deliveries and select maintenance services. Yoshi’s trained mechanics pump the gas and handle maintenance while the car is parked at work or at home.

Refueling can be scheduled once ($7/delivery), or on a regular basis ($20/month). Additional services include oil change, car wash and detail, repairs, windshield fluid, wiper blade changes, window cleaning, and tire air check and fill. The service is currently in 12 cities and is also used by companies to keep their car fleets fueled up and ready to go.

Fill ‘er up.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the importance of clearly defining a target market.
  2. Poll students. Ask who would be interested in a system to automatically refuel their cars.
  3. Show Yoshi’s site: http://www.startyoshi.com/
  4. Show video of the service: https://youtu.be/xmqrZ2DvwVE
  5. For Yoshi, what is the target market? Consumers? Corporations?
  6. Divide students into teams and have each team develop a profile of a target market for Yoshi. Include demographics, psychographics, behaviors, values, attitudes, etc.
  7. Based on the target market profile, what makes this product unique for these customers?
  8. Debrief the exercise.

Source: Harlow, T. (1 March, 2018). New on-demand fuel service will allow Twin City drivers to skip the gas station. Minneapolis Star Tribune.

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TED Talk: China and the Future of Shopping

We all know that technology has changed the shopping experience. Instead of going into brick-and-mortar stores, or in addition to going into brick-and-mortar stores, shoppers now turn to PCs and mobile devices. Not only that, technology has changed our shopping behavior even when we are IN a store. This is true world-wide, but the future of shopping is here today in China.

In this TED Talks video, Angela Wang, a retail expert with firm BCG, explores the broad range of shopping services available online in China. In China, everything takes place on smart phones; 500 million Chinese consumers regularly use their mobile devices for purchasing goods and services. Think about that number – 500 million people. As Wang states, that is the combined population of the U.S., U.K, and Germany! And, all this has happened in only the last five years.

China’s technology firms are also powerhouses. Alibaba and Tencent own 90% of China’s e-commerce market, 85% of its social media, 85% of its Internet payments, along with diverse digital content, video, movies, literature, gaming and more.

Key trends that Wang sees in China shopping patterns are a growth in spontaneity, co-creation of products, ultra-convenience, and social shopping. Using WeChat, the mobile shopping journey in China far surpasses the U.S.

Marketers can learn a lot of lessons from this informative talk.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss with students that while the buying process may vary slightly for different products and target markets, the basic 5-step process is problem recognition, information search, evaluation of alternatives, purchase decision, and post-purchase behavior. Is this still the correct model?
  2. Discuss the changes that the students have made in their own shopping behavior. How do they use mobile devices to shop? Map the journey on the board.
  3. Show the TED Talk video. Make sure students pay attention to the end of the talk when the shopping journey is explained (9:00 minute mark): https://www.ted.com/talks/angela_wang_how_china_is_changing_the_future_of_shopping/transcript
  4. How does the Chinese shopping journey compare to the traditional U.S. consumer model?
  5. For a product, have students work on the actions taken in each of the five steps in the traditional model. Then have them work out the steps of the Chinese model.
  6. Debrief the exercise.

Source: TED Talks

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Ads, Ads, Everywhere….

 

Advertising is everywhere. Actually, make that EVERYWHERE! As far as the eye can see, it can land on an advertisement or promotion. Whether it is traditional media (such as radio and TV) or other places such as billboards, vending machines, bus stops, toilet stalls, gas pumps, subway turnstiles, street crossings… you get the point. We are surrounded by advertising.

A recent study estimates that daily media consumption is now at an all-time high of 9.8 hours. However, the good news for consumers is that they now have more tools (such as DVRs and remote controls) for avoiding ads. Another study noted that message and brand exposure can range anywhere from 3,000 to 20,000 messages per day. The higher numbers include labels seen in stores (or on clothes), ads in mailboxes, cars on the highway, etc. However, consumers cannot really process that many exposures. What does it amount to?

  • 5,000+ ads/brand exposure per day
  • 362 “ads only” exposure per day
  • 153 “ads only” noted per day
  • 86 “ads only that gain awareness per day
  • Finally, only 12 “ads only” made an impression

Bottom line: Only a very small number of advertisements make it through our filters and lead to sales. The tricky part for marketers is to determine which ads are the important ones.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Have students look around the room and in their backpacks/bags. How many ads or brands do they see?
  2. Poll students: Who watched TV last night? What ads do they recall?
  3. Show the article with chart: https://sjinsights.net/2014/09/29/new-research-sheds-light-on-daily-ad-exposures/
  4. Put students into teams. Have each team identify an advertisement that they can recall and believe is effective.
  5. Have the teams explain how this ad was effective.

Source: SJ Insights, Media Dynamics, Inc.

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