Tag Archives: integrated marketing campaigns

Super Bowl 50 Advertising

Super

With millions of viewers worldwide, the Super Bowl has become one of the premier venues for marketers. The thrills, the chills, the laughter, the tears – and that’s just the advertisements! At a cost of $4.6 – $5 million for 30 seconds of air time, the Super Bowl is also the most expensive advertising placement of any event or show. Add the costs of designing and producing ads, plus the integration into other marketing tactics, and a company can easily spend upwards of $6 million at a single event.

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, Super Bowl advertisements have become a talking point during and after the game. (Did you see “PuppyMonkeyBaby”?) It’s a big stage, and can also be a big risk. With an audience of 111.9 million viewers, the 50th Super Bowl is now ranked as the third most watched TV program in U.S. history, eclipsed only by Super Bowls 49 and 48. And days later, we are still watching ads and measuring results.

Watch the ads – which company do you think did the best, and worst, job on their advertisements?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Bring up one of the Web sites that have all the Super Bowl ads: http://adage.com/article/special-report-super-bowl/ads-super-bowl-50-a-z/302443/?utm_source=daily_email&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=adage&ttl=1455508006#Wedding
  2. Divide students into teams of two. Have each team select a Super Bowl ad to analyze and present in class.
  3. What is the target market, key message, and offer from the ad?
  4. How does the ad integrate with a company’s other advertisements?
  5. Are the messages integrated with a company’s Web site and social media?
  6. As a class, after each commercial have students assign one to five stars for the advertisements. Which advertisement won your class’ votes?

Source: Nielsen, Ad Age Daily, Brandchannel.com, other news sources

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The Sound of a Brand

Sound

We all know that companies spend a great deal of money to build a brand and awareness. We can picture the brands – a graphic, a color, an icon. There are many visual components such as logo, color, type face, and graphics that go into the development of a brand visual. But why stop at a visual? Why not go beyond sight and into the realm of sound?

Brandsonics, a process from Cincinnati-based company Sound Images, works to build a sound and music that is identifiable to brands. The company’s process uses up to 42 different brand characteristics and distills these to five essential brand dimensions. These are then matched with an appropriate sound. The results might indicate the brand sound needs string instruments, or a specific beat, or a melody, or a voice.

Consider the various ways brands communicate with customers. Now, add a few beats and get ready to sing along.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the various components used to establish a brand and build awareness. What are the elements that are used to build a brand?
  2. Show the Bransonics video: http://www.soundimages.com/brandsonics/
  3. As a class, discuss what elements might help a company determine a signature sound.
  4. Divide students into teams. Have each team select a brand and discuss the brand personality and characteristics to match the elements for a signature sound.
  5. Have the teams find a sample of music that could be used for the brand.

Source: Ad Age Daily

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Super Bowl 2015 Advertising Extravaganza

SuperBowl

With millions of viewers worldwide, the Super Bowl has become one of the premier venues for marketers. The thrills, the chills, the laughter, the tears – and that’s just the advertisements! At a cost of $4.2 million for 30 seconds of air time, the Super Bowl is also the most expensive advertising placement of any event or show. Add the costs of designing and producing ads, plus the integration into other marketing tactics, and a company can easily spend upwards of $5 million at a single event.

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, Super Bowl advertisements have become a talking point during and after the game. It’s a big stage, and can also be a big risk. With an audience of 114.4 million viewers, the 49th Super Bowl is now ranked as the most watched TV program in U.S. history. Even at the end of the game, 74% of all TVs in the U.S. were tuned in and watched the final play. And days later, we are still watching ads and measuring results.

Watch the ads – which company do you think did the best, and worst, job on their advertisements?

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Bring up one of the Web sites that have all the Super Bowl ads. These can be found on http://www.superbowlcommercial2015.com/; http://adage.com/special-reports/superbowl/148; http://www.superbowl-commercials.org/2015; and other sites.
  1. Divide students into teams of two. Have each team select a Super Bowl ad to analyze and present in class.
  2. What is the target market, key message, and offer from the ad?
  3. How does the ad integrate with a company’s other advertisements?
  4. Are the messages integrated with a company’s Web site and social media?
  5. As a class, after each commercial have students assign one to five stars for the advertisements. Which advertisement won your class’ votes?

Source: Nielsen, National Retail Federation, Ad Age Daily, Brandchannel.com, other news sources

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Filed under Classroom Activities