Tag Archives: Drones

Drones Can Help Save Lives

In the United States there are roughly 350,000 cardiac arrests each year, and in Europe nearly a million people each year suffer such cardiac arrests. And, each minute to health care and a defibrillator is critical to survival. Today, people outside of hospitals who have a heart attack have only an 8-10% survival rate due to the slow response time of emergency services. This calls for a new solution to this critical health issue: drones.

Drones can help save lives of heart attack victims by delivering defibrillators remotely, much faster than it takes an ambulance to arrive on the scene. In a recent study in Sweden, the Swedish Transportation Agency equipped drones with light-weight defibrillators (1.7 pounds) and deployed them from fire stations north of Stockholm.

In tests, drones can average 100 km/hour, making the average arrival time of the drones 5:21 minutes; this is compared to the average ambulance arrival time of 22:00 minutes, shaving more than 16 minutes off defibrillator arrival time. Time that is critical to a person’s survival. When not flying, the drone can be folded and become a tool box for emergency supplies.

Drones to the rescue!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss the use of new technologies such as drones with students.
  2. Show video: https://youtu.be/y-rEI4bezWc
  3. Divide students into team: What other applications could drones have in the marketplace and health care industry?
  4. Have each team share its recommendations.
  5. Select the top recommendation. Have students develop a marketing program for this solution using drones.

Source:  Los Angeles Times, Tribune, other news source

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

Amazon’s New Drone!

Drone

Amazon is pushing the envelope once again. Just in time for holiday shopping, Amazon disclosed a video of its new drone delivery demonstration. While it is not yet a legal form of transportation for packages, nonetheless it is pushing the boundaries of the supply chain and shifting consumers’ expectations for technology.

Two years ago Amazon first announced its intention to use drones for delivery of small packages, showing a prototype octocopter drone. The new version features an updated drone vehicle that flies under 400 feet altitude (thus avoiding trees and houses) and weighs less than 55 pounds. This means that it is within the size limit as stated by the FAA in February. (New commercial operation specifications are expected from the FAA in 2016.)

The drones will have intelligent programming that enables the device to identify and avoid things in the air. Each drone can carry up to five pounds and fly 15 miles, landing on a pre-determined launch pad. And, with an Amazon Prime Air membership, packages are delivered in 30 minutes.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss distribution channels and supply chain. What are the elements involved, costs, etc.? How will drone deliveries impact supply chains?
  2. Show the Amazon drone video:

http://www.amazon.com/b?node=8037720011

  1. Discuss the video: implications, risks, issues, benefits, etc.
  2. Divide students into teams. Have each team select a product that might qualify for delivery via drone and draw a diagram of a possible distribution model both with and without drones.
  3. Debrief the exercise by having students share their models and discuss the pros/cons.

Source: Amazon, New York Times, other news sources

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities

Project Wing – Google’s Drone Program

Drone

Look out, Amazon – you are not the only drone in town any more. There is a new delivery drone being flown by Google. Tested this summer in Australia, Google’s program, named “Project Wing,” is the result of two years of research and development to design a delivery product. The result is small, unmanned, drone aircrafts that look like – and act like – a cross between a helicopter and an airplane.

Google tried various design approaches including a parachute for package delivery and a missile-like delivery (shooting the package downwards). They also tried to actual land the drone with package, but decided it could create problems if people (or pets) got too close to the drone and might lose a finger while trying to retrieve the package! The final prototype uses a type of filament to lower the package to customers from a drone kept at roughly 150 feet above ground.

While the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not yet given approval for any aerial delivery service, the genie is out of the bottle and the new technologies are bound to find a use in commerce. (Pizza delivery, anyone?)

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Discuss distribution channels and supply chain. What are the elements involved, costs, etc.?
  2. Show the Google drone video: http://youtu.be/cRTNvWcx9Oo
  3. Discuss the video: implications, risks, issues, benefits, etc.
  4. For fun, show a video of a drone delivering a Domino’s pizza (the video was made by a British franchisee as a publicity stunt): http://youtu.be/on4DRTUvst0
  5. Divide students into teams. Have each team select a product that might qualify for delivery via drone and draw a diagram of a possible distribution model both with and without drones.
  6. Debrief the exercise by having students share their models and discuss the pros/cons.

Source: New York Times, The Atlantic, Wall Street Journal, other news sources

Leave a comment

Filed under Classroom Activities