Tag Archives: ethnicity

Segregation in Store Products

The United States has become increasingly diversified with growth in many ethnic market segments, making these no longer “minority” groups, but a substantial percentage of the U.S. population. But why do retail stores still carry many products that are aimed at Caucasian shoppers, and neglect other ethnicities? What are the products that are oriented to Hispanic, Asian, Latino, and African American consumers?

Mass market retail stores have long used a program called “planogramming” – a model that retailers use to determine the types and placement of products on shelves to maximize sales. However, many stores, even those in ethnic communities often relegate ethnic-oriented products to back shelves.

Planogramming uses sophisticated modeling techniques to determine the optimum products and placements. However, merchandise planners must take a long hard look at their consumers and market base in order to get the mix right.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Divide students into groups and have them list products that have distinct ethnic differences in these categories:
    1. Hair care
    2. Makeup
    3. Grooming
    4. Snacks
    5. Beverages
    6. Shaving
    7. Ask students how much diversity in products do they see where they shop? Are the products are for one ethnicity? What about in communities with a diverse shopping mix of consumers and ethnic groups?
    8. Have students now search major retailers’ Web sites. What are their observations relative to this topic? Are these the same comments that students have about the bricks-and-mortar stores?
    9. What could retailers do to improve this situation?
    10. Have students research “planogramming” online to understand it further.
    11. Have students develop a shelving or floor plan to reflect an ethnic market.

 

Source:   Ad Age Daily, 3/14/12

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The new look of American marriage

According to recent research from the Pew Research Center, intermarriage is on the rise, and public acceptance of interracial marriages has grown.  Intermarriage continues to increase, both in frequency and acceptance, in the United States. The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from each other increased to 15.1% in 2010; this is more than double the percentage in 1980.

Other notable findings in the report are that gender patterns in intermarriage vary significantly by race; recent newlyweds who have “married out” are similar in characteristics to those who have “married in.” However the overall similarities mask sharp differences that emerge when the analysis examines pairings by race and ethnicity. There are also differences in intermarriage between regions in the U.S. Roughly 22% of all newlyweds in Western states are married to someone of a different race.

Finally, is more intermarriage good for society? According to the survey, 43% say that people marrying different races has been a change for the better in our society. Consider what these changes will mean to companies in the development of promotional campaigns.

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. 1.     The full report is available at http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/02/16/the-rise-of-intermarriage/
  2. 2.     Have students take the survey on Pew’s Web site:
    1. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/attitudes-about-the-changing-american-family/
    2. How did students score?
    3. What are surprises from the survey?
    4. 3.     What are the implications of a changing family structure for marketers?
    5. 4.     How should companies market their products in light of this data?
      1. Choose three companies and design key messages to account for the changing family structure.
      2. Choose three products and redesign the product for the changing family structure.

 

Source:   Pew Research Center, 2/16/12,

 

 

 

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