Break Smartphone Addiction: Try the NoPhone Air!

phone

Look around you. How many people do you see on smartphones? How many students in class are on their smartphones? Are you tired of all the distractions? If so, then the new NoPhone Air is meant for you!

Recently announced at a technology conference in Canada, the latest NoPhone Air drew gasps of astonishment from the audience. The simple plastic rectangle looks like a space-age smartphone, but it does nothing. That’s right – you heard us. The NoPhone Air does absolutely nothing.

The NoPhone Air is ideal for people who are tired of either seeing others glued to smartphones, or want to break their own smartphone addiction. While some people have gone back to old-school flip phones, others use mobile apps or bags that block cell phone signals.

Researchers have been studying the impact that technology has on social interaction. About 70% of college students use their phones during class, which can result in lower grades than for those who refrain from smartphone use.

More than 10,000 units have been sold in the past two years at a cost of $10 per unit. Place your order now before they all sell out!

Group Activities and Discussion Questions:

  1. Poll students: How often do they check their smartphones in an hour? How do they feel when they cannot use their smartphones? Are they willing to give up their smartphones?
  2. Show the NoPhone Air: http://www.thenophone.com/blogs/news/introducing-the-nophone-air (make sure to view the video at bottom of page).
  3. Also show the Kickstarter campaign:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/nophone-usa/the-nophone-air

  1. Get students’ reactions to the NoPhone Air.
  2. Next, discuss promotional tactics.
  3. Divide students into groups. For NoPhone Air, have each team select three different tactics. For each tactic, explain why it was selected and how it will be used.
  4. Debrief by putting together the entire suggested lists on the white board. As a final step, have the entire class vote on the top three tactics to use.

Source: Wall Street Journal

 

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